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23.9.14 2335
The W - Print - Whatcha reading currently?
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Niki
Linguica








Since: 13.7.09
From: expat in The Hague, Netherlands

Since last post: 240 days
Last activity: 35 days
#1 Posted on
Fiction, non-fiction, comics, poetry -- whatever you're reading! Even audiobooks.

Currently I am reading Side Jobs (jim-butcher.com) by Jim Butcher, part of the Dresden Files series. It's an urban fantasy series set in Chicago, narrated by a wizard/private investigator. Unfortunately it is taking longer than I thought it would...

This particular book is actually a short story collection. Before each chapter the author includes a short vignette about the story and why he chose to write it.

So how about you? What item(s) are currently on your nightstand, waiting to be devoured?
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Dexley's Midnight Jogger
Pepperoni
Moderator








Since: 10.10.02
From: New Hampshire

Since last post: 233 days
Last activity: 147 days
#2 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.29
I just finished reading "Carrie" by Stephen King today. Tomorrow I'll restart The Great Lenore (amazon.com). My girlfriend picked it up for me after meeting the author and having him sign a copy for me. It's not my favorite but I'm halfway through.
Mr. Boffo
Scrapple








Since: 24.3.02
From: Oshkosh, WI

Since last post: 422 days
Last activity: 383 days
#3 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.28
I'm very slowly making my way through "The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract". There are some really great essays there. The one where he looks at how the commissioners of the 1920s decided the yearly batting average leader, and how that relates to the way people treat rules today has changed. The one where he says every area of discussion has what he calls a "bullshit dump", where a poorly understood area of it is used to reconcile what your analysis says to be true and what your heart believes to be true (he says the biggest bullshit dump in baseball is called "clutch performance).

After that my uncle borrowed me "I Am Number Four", which was the inspiration for the movie of the same name, and I'll have to read that.
odessasteps
Scrapple








Since: 2.1.02
From: MD, USA

Since last post: 98 days
Last activity: 65 days
#4 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.03
Stan hansen's autobiography.

Pretty decent and written in a no frills, straightforward manner.



Mark Coale
Odessa Steps Magazine presents


RUSSIAN FLAG BURIAL - an examination of 1984 mid-south


Lise
Mrs. Guru








Since: 11.12.01

Since last post: 390 days
Last activity: 11 days
#5 Posted on | Instant Rating: 10.00
I am apparently the only person I know who started reading Lois McMaster Bujold via her Sharing Knife series and not the Vorkosigan Saga. I'm on Book 3: Passage (The W at Amazon)

/edit *shakes fist* I will triumph over you stupid Amazon tag!

(edited by Lise on 14.12.11 2040)
Mike Zeidler
Pepperoni








Since: 27.6.02

Since last post: 42 days
Last activity: 1 day
#6 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.36
I'm currently trying to finish up Terry Pratchett's latest Snuff: A Novel of Discworld (The W at Amazon)but it's taking me longer (three months!) than any of his other books have to finish. I blame my local library's recent switchover to a new catalog which only gave me three days to try to finish the book initially, and my initial excitement at getting a kindle burning me out on reading for a awhile.

Also currently reading:
The Supergirls: Fashion, Feminism, Fantasy, and the History of Comic Book Heroines Which is interesting, but kind-of basic in the history department.

Science Fiction Television (The Praeger Television Collection) which is pretty dry and skims over quite a bit, and I think I've already read it once, but it's so unmemorable I picked it up again.

and finally - Shazam!: The Golden Age of the World's Mightiest Mortal - Basically Chip Kidd doing his thing again (not a fan) but with Captain Marvel this time. It was nice to see evidence that Billy and crew had merchandise to back up the "More popular than Superman" quote that keeps getting bandied about.

I think my problem is that I want more in-depth analysis than the subject matters will likely support, though 50s and 60s Sci-Fi TV will support quite a bit, so I'm not sure what happened there.



"Tattoos are the mullets of the aughts." - Mike Naimark
rinberg
Boudin rouge








Since: 30.1.02
From: South Georgia

Since last post: 988 days
Last activity: 26 days
#7 Posted on
I was recently given most of the Shannara novels, which I have on my near-infinite "I should read this someday" list, so I'm currently on The Elfstones of Shannara (The W at Amazon) by Terry Brooks, which is book 2 of the original trilogy.



One of the Thirty-two (or maybe Thirty-four....)!

kaynart. Get yours at flagrantdisregard.com/flickr
AWArulz
Knackwurst








Since: 28.1.02
From: Louisville, KY

Since last post: 1 hour
Last activity: 1 hour
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Y!:
#8 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.87
I am reading "the Irregulars" - a book about the British security Coordination during WWII in Washington. Pretty good book. Funny to think of the guy who write Charlie and the Chocolate Factory as a very important spy. Seems Ian Flemming and David Niven were in the same club.



We'll be back right after order has been restored here in the Omni Center.

That the universe was formed by a fortuitous concourse of atoms, I will no more believe than that the accidental jumbling of the alphabet would fall into a most ingenious treatise of philosophy - Swift

Mr. Boffo
Scrapple








Since: 24.3.02
From: Oshkosh, WI

Since last post: 422 days
Last activity: 383 days
#9 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.28
    Originally posted by AWArulz
    I am reading "the Irregulars" - a book about the British security Coordination during WWII in Washington. Pretty good book. Funny to think of the guy who write Charlie and the Chocolate Factory as a very important spy. Seems Ian Flemming and David Niven were in the same club.

That's crazy, I just read a cracked article today about that very subject. http://www.cracked.com/article_19458_the-5-most-badass-teams-famous-people-to-ever-join-forces.html

    The group's main mission was to befriend important and influential people and convince them to join the war effort or, if that didn't work, spy on them and gather enough material to blackmail them. And that's where their penises came in. Roald Dahl became the personal sausage delivery guy for Clare Booth Luce, Republican congresswoman and the wife of the owner of Time, Life and Fortune magazines. Her husband, Henry Luce, was considered an anti-British isolationist, so nailing the man's wife just to spy on him was actually a very important mission. After just a few days of it, Dahl called his superiors pleading to abort the project because, and this is a real quote, "I am all ****ed out! That ******* woman has absolutely screwed me from one end of the room to the other for three ******* nights."
KJames199
Scrapple
Moderator








Since: 10.12.01
From: #yqr

Since last post: 1 day
Last activity: 15 min.
#10 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.76
Hey, I think you can add new posts to this here thread now. Someone will surely tell me if I shouldn't have done this.
John Orquiola
Scrapple








Since: 28.2.02
From: Boston

Since last post: 87 days
Last activity: 87 days
#11 Posted on | Instant Rating: 6.26
Based on Mike Zeider's recommendation, I read and enjoyed The Supergirls, though I agree with his assessment about it. I also read Tina Fey's Bossypants a couple of weeks ago.

Currently, I'm finally finishing up the last chapters of A Dance With Dragons (My Kindle Fire says I'm 84% done), and I started reading Rob Lowe's Stories I Only Tell My Friends.

Next, I'm debating whether to start World War Z or Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. I'd like to get those read before the movies come out in 2012. Also, I have the A Princess of Mars books, and I figure I should read one before John Carter (Tim Riggins of Mars) comes out.

(edited by John Orquiola on 29.12.11 1308)


@BackoftheHead


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samoflange
Lap cheong








Since: 22.2.04
From: Cambridge, MA

Since last post: 342 days
Last activity: 334 days
#12 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.38
I just finished Arthur C. Clarke's four part Rama series this morning. These books have been a great ride.

The first book, Rendezvous with Rama, is a fun but simple story of humans observing and later boarding an unknown alien craft. Not much happened and not much was learned, but the flow of the story was masterful and it does it's job very well as being the prologue to the story told in the next three books.

In the second book, Rama II, is set about a hundred years later when a second alien craft comes to Earth. The humans who board it this time around encounter and learn much more than their predecessors. I won't get into any details about what happens later in the book and then in the 3rd and 4th books (Garden of Rama & Rama Revealed), but each book became more and more interesting. I would say the third book is the best of the bunch, because it's where things start to break down due to the faults of humanity, a depressing, but interesting sci-fi trope that I enjoy.

Clarke starts off with a regular group of humans, and later focuses on some incredibly idealized individuals who are almost allegorically kind, thoughtful, intelligent and open minded. Then the rest of humanity again rears its ugly head. The contrast is jarring, but very, very effective.

The ending of the 4th book was just as clean and succinct as the rest of the series, and, though it fit perfectly, I would have preferred a more open ending so there would be more to wonder about after finishing.

Rama is one of those series that leaves you empty after reading it. I have many stacks of unread books to read and I can't yet bring myself to pick the one that will follow up.

(edited by samoflange on 29.12.11 1645)


Lloyd: When I met Mary, I got that old fashioned romantic feeling, where I'd do anything to bone her.
Harry: That's a special feeling.
samoflange
Lap cheong








Since: 22.2.04
From: Cambridge, MA

Since last post: 342 days
Last activity: 334 days
#13 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.38
    Originally posted by John Orquiola
    World War Z


I learned about this book from the audio version, which is a very engrossing listen if you have a few 6 hours car rides in your future. The print book was not nearly as engaging, but is still the best piece of zombie literature outside of the Walking Dead comics.



Lloyd: When I met Mary, I got that old fashioned romantic feeling, where I'd do anything to bone her.
Harry: That's a special feeling.
Lise
Mrs. Guru








Since: 11.12.01

Since last post: 390 days
Last activity: 11 days
#14 Posted on | Instant Rating: 10.00
On all of our various holiday driving we listened to the audiobook versions of Scott Westerfield's Leviathan series. Since we'd started the first book on a previous drive, we were a few hours short so I got the audiobook of Feed by Mira Grant (The W at Amazon) which friends have been HOUNDING me to read. It's OK so far even though I really dislike zombies.

I also started reading Boneshaker by Cherie Priest The story amuses, but it irritated me that the TPB is printed in brown ink and thus is a little harder on the eyes (not to mention gimmicky). I really wish I'd gotten this book on Kindle instead of print.
bash91
Merguez








Since: 2.1.02
From: Plain Dealing, LA

Since last post: 769 days
Last activity: 1 hour
#15 Posted on | Instant Rating: 10.00
This is the first time in several years where it has just been us at home over Christmas break so I've had much more time than usual to read recently. For work, I've been reading Change.edu (The W at Amazon), Readicide: How Schools Are Killing Reading and What You Can Do About It and When Kids Can't Read: What Teachers Can Do.

For pleasure, I've been reading a lot of different stuff recently. I've particularly enjoyed the Iron Druid Chronicles by Kevin Hearne (Hounded, Hexed, and Hammered) as well as the New Crobuzon books by China Mieville (Perdido Street Station, Iron Council, and The Scar). I also really enjoyed the one I finished yesterday, Monster Hunter International.

Tim



Vocatus atque non vocatus, Deus aderit. -- Erasmus

All others things being equal, the simplest solution is usually stupidity. -- Darwin Minor
Guru Zim
SQL Dejection
Administrator








Since: 9.12.01
From: Bay City, OR

Since last post: 10 hours
Last activity: 6 hours
AIM:  
#16 Posted on | Instant Rating: 8.69
I just read Start with Why, the worst book I've ever been asked to read by any company I've ever worked for. That's actually an accomplishment.

I didn't like it. Can you tell?




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DrewDewce
Bratwurst








Since: 2.1.02
From: The Derby City

Since last post: 21 days
Last activity: 3 hours
Y!:
#17 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.80
I'm looking forward to reading "The Walking Dead - Rise of The Governor" book that I got for Christmas and finally finishing up the History of ESPN book.

Plus, a "New DCU 52" comic I'm enjoying that I was on the fence about going in: Wonder Woman. I've enjoyed a few runs on her book in the past (Perez/Byrne/Jiminez/Simone), but this has been surprisingly good to me.

I've also added Animal Man to my pull list despite not being a big fan of the artwork.

Peter Tomasi's Batman & Robin has been surprisingly good too. I've been looking for excuses to cut back (especially on Bat books), but couldn't cut this one off my hold list. David Finch's Batman, the Dark Knight will likely be cut instead despite enjoying the artwork there.



"You are going to get a certain amount of snarkiness on the Internet no matter what, and my rule is that you don't post anything that you wouldn't say to someone's face."
Marc Andreyko (Writer of DC Comic's "Manhunter")
cranlsn
Liverwurst








Since: 18.3.02
From: Sussex, WI

Since last post: 148 days
Last activity: 13 hours
#18 Posted on

Being a Stephen King fan I was of course gifted his latest, 11/22/63, and I'm just starting it. Seems to be on par with some of his better stuff so far.

I also got a Kindle...but no $$ at the moment, so I'm looking at few free things as well as whatever's available through the library (nothing yet). I kind of like that resorting to free and/or what's available is making me look at a few things that I normally woudln't have.
Lise
Mrs. Guru








Since: 11.12.01

Since last post: 390 days
Last activity: 11 days
#19 Posted on | Instant Rating: 10.00
Pretty much anything in public domain is available for free on Kindle. The one everyone seems to be happiest to find is all the Jeeves and Wooster, P.G. Wodehouse books
dunkndollaz
Banger








Since: 3.1.02
From: Northern NJ

Since last post: 13 days
Last activity: 12 hours
#20 Posted on | Instant Rating: 9.53
Just finished "Heat Wave" by Richard Castle - yes, the fictional author played on TV by Nathan Fillion

and now I have started The Rising Tide by Jeff Shaara though I have never been much of a WWII fan.



I think my kids are trying to kill me

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Geoff Johns is the creative VP of DC Entertainment (or his title is something like that) and I believe he's one of the architects and writers of Flashpoint, so... he's playing a key creative role in whatever the Master Plan is. I'll say this:
- John Orquiola, Flashpoint and a DC Universe Reboot? (2011)
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