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The W - Football - The State of the BCS - Week 5
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Texas Kelly
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Ladies and gentlemen, the following public service message is brought to you by your friends from D-Generation X, who would like to remind each and every one of you that if you're not down with that, we've got two words for you...

THE STATE OF THE BCS - Week 5

CURRENT BCS STANDINGS
The bracketed sequence following a team's name in the BCS standings refers to (in order) the team's Harris Interactive poll ranking, the team's USA Today coaches' poll ranking, and the average of the six computer rankings (Anderson & Hester, Richard Billingsley, Colley Matrix, Kenneth Massey, Jeff Sagarin, and Peter Wolfe). The average of these three rankings determines the team's BCS ranking. For the full listing, check ESPN (sports.espn.go.com), which provides a more detailed breakdown than the "official" listing at FOX Sports.

1. Ohio State [1, 1, 3]
2. Michigan [2, 2, 1]
3. Southern California [3, 4, 4] (+4)
4. Florida [4, 3, 6]
5. Notre Dame [5, 5, 5] (+4)
6. Rutgers [7, 8, 2] (+7)
7. Arkansas [6, 6, 9] (+4)
8. West Virginia [8, 7, 11] (+2)
9. Wisconsin [11, 10, 8] (+6)
10. Louisville [10, 12, 7] (-7)
11. Louisiana State [9, 9, 13] (+1)
12. Boise State [13, 13, 10] (+2)
13. Texas [12, 11, 16] (-8)
14. Auburn [15, 15, 14] (-8)
15. California-Berkeley [17, 17, 12] (-7)
16. Wake Forest [14, 14, 17] (+3)

Well, as you'd expect with all the upsets in the middle of the top 10 this week, a lot of reshuffling happened in the rankings. The big winner (much to my consternation) was USC, which reclaimed the #3 ranking it lost only two weeks ago in a not-so-upset loss to Oregon State, and is in prime position to move to #2 next week pending how The Game plays out this weekend. My feelings about USC are well-documented, so I'll just move right on past them...

While I'm glad to see Rutgers at #6 given it's where I placed them in my own personal rankings once the weekend was over, I'm utterly befuddled to see Arkansas ranked behind them. Arkansas absolutely stomped a good Tennessee team on national television and is clearly the hottest team in the land right now, and yet Rutgers saw a much bigger bounce in the rankings than the Razorbacks did (which probably had a lot to do with the computers' high opinion of Rutgers even prior to the win over Louisville). It's going to be up to the human polls to provide further lift to Rutgers until the trip to West Virginia, given they've got two relatively weak games to get through before then. Arkansas is in the same boat this week, but then they get LSU at home, and a dominant win would be a huge boon to the Razorbacks' title hopes.

GAMES TO WATCH THIS WEEK
Well, duh. Michigan at Ohio State (Saturday, 3:30 PM). It's called The Game for a reason. Do I need to draw you a diagram? Other games of interest: California-Berkley at Southern California (Saturday, 8:00 PM) is the de-facto Pac-10 Championship Game, is key to USC's national title hopes, and will serve in many respects as a referendum on just who the real Trojans are. Finally, Maryland at Boston College (Saturday, 12:00 PM), while lacking any direct BCS implications, will go a long way towards clearing the currently very muddy picture in the ACC Atlantic, and should be a well-played contest between two teams that will leave everything out on the field.

PROJECTED BERTHS
Projected berths are based on a team's record in conference play. Teams with an equal number of losses are considered to be in the same tier. (This means that a 3-0 record in conference play would be just as good as a 5-0 record and better than a 4-1 record for the purposes of projections.) Mandated conference tiebreakers are used where possible to break ties for automatic conference berths (for conferences that do not have title games) or bids to conference title games. In the case of a tie that cannot be broken, or in the instance where the two teams projected to meet for a conference title have the same record in conference play, the tied teams' BCS ranking is used to break the tie.

MAJOR CONFERENCES
ACC: Georgia Tech (def. Maryland)
Big East: Rutgers
Big Ten: Michigan
Big 12: Texas (def. Nebraska)
Pac-10: Southern California
SEC: Arkansas (def. Florida)

OTHER BIDS
Non-BCS Conference Auto Bid: Boise State (WAC; #12)
Other Auto Bids: Ohio State (Big Ten; #1), Notre Dame (Independent; #5), Florida (SEC; #4 with no SEC rep in title game)
At-Large Entries: No Slots Left

The team at the top of the list praying that The Game turns out to be a blowout win for Ohio State is Wisconsin. Right now, they're clearly on the outside looking in given the BCS's rules limiting a conference to two entries, but if the Wolverines lose real bad, there's an *outside* chance the Badgers might be able to pass them. It's going to be tough since Wisconsin is closing with an incredibly weak opponent (Buffalo), and everything's got to go just right for them... but the chance is still there. I'd only call it about 7%, however.

Boise State moves up into official lock status with its escape over San Jose State this week (at #12, they'd be in no matter what happens, provided they can stay there). Broncos fans will be holding their collective breath, however, because their champion thoroughbred is lame (superstar RB Ian Johnson, as of Tuesday, was still in the hospital being treated for a partially collapsed lung) - they will need him to see this through and if they slip up even once, the dream dies.

PROJECTED MATCHUPS
National Championship Game: Ohio State v. Michigan
Rose Bowl: Southern California v. Notre Dame
Orange Bowl: Georgia Tech v. Florida
Fiesta Bowl: Texas v. Boise State
Sugar Bowl: Arkansas v. Rutgers

Big Ten auto-entry Ohio State & Big Ten champion Michigan are automatically placed into the National Championship Game due to their #1 & #2 rankings, respectively. Pac-10 champion Southern California is placed into the Rose Bowl, SEC champion Arkansas is placed into the Sugar Bowl, ACC champion Georgia Tech is placed into the Orange Bowl, and Big 12 champion Texas is placed into the Fiesta Bowl due to traditional conference tie-ins.

Since the Rose Bowl loses one of its conference champions to the title game, it gets to replace that team before the other bowls make their selections. It chooses independent auto-entry Notre Dame to be its second representative. (The Rose Bowl, according to BCS by-laws, gets top priority over all BCS games other than the National Championship Game in filling its vacancies.)

Priority for the remaining selections is based on a bowl's proximity to the National Championship Game in scheduling, with games scheduled nearer to the Championship Game receiving higher priority. Based on this, the BCS has established the following priority order for this year's bowls:

1. Sugar Bowl
2. Orange Bowl
3. Fiesta Bowl

The new BCS by-laws do not impose restrictions on selecting teams for final allocations in the vein like "conference champions cannot be listed last" as in previous years. Hence, it is prudent to presume that the remaining selections will be made in order of BCS rankings (with exceptions made where needed to avoid matching teams from the same conference against each other).This results in Big East champion Rutgers being selected by the Sugar Bowl despite Florida having a higher BCS ranking (since if Florida were to be selected, it would create a rematch of the SEC championship game). As a result, SEC auto-entry Florida is selected by the Orange Bowl instead, and finally, WAC auto-entry Boise State is selected by the Fiesta Bowl.

Note that for obvious reasons, no shifts would be made to change the National Championship Game from matching the #1 and #2 ranked teams, even if (as projected) it involves the meeting of two teams from the same conference.

(edited by Texas Kelly on 14.11.06 2152)


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TheBucsFan
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#2 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.24
    Originally posted by Texas Kelly
    Note that for obvious reasons, no shifts would be made to change the National Championship Game from matching the #1 and #2 ranked teams, even if (as projected) it involves the meeting of two teams from the same conference.


What would happen if the No. 1 and No. 2 team in the BCS were from the same conference, but neither was the conference champion? I know it's incredibly unlikely, but say in a year where no teams go undefeated, Wisconsin and Ohio State both went 11-1, with a loss to Michigan each, while Michigan loses two out-of-conference games. Ohio State and Wisconsin finish the season ranked 1-2, respectively, but Michigan is the Big Ten champion. Does Wisconsin get left out?
Zeruel
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#3 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.05
    Originally posted by TheBucsFan
      Originally posted by Texas Kelly
      Note that for obvious reasons, no shifts would be made to change the National Championship Game from matching the #1 and #2 ranked teams, even if (as projected) it involves the meeting of two teams from the same conference.


    What would happen if the No. 1 and No. 2 team in the BCS were from the same conference, but neither was the conference champion? I know it's incredibly unlikely, but say in a year where no teams go undefeated, Wisconsin and Ohio State both went 11-1, with a loss to Michigan each, while Michigan loses two out-of-conference games. Ohio State and Wisconsin finish the season ranked 1-2, respectively, but Michigan is the Big Ten champion. Does Wisconsin get left out?


End of section 4:

    Originally posted by http://www.bcsfootball.org/bcsfb/eligibility
    All teams earning automatic berths must be selected. No more than two teams from any single Conference may play in BCS games in a single year, regardless of whether they are automatic qualifiers or at-large picks.


Michigan gets left out in your example, since Ohio State and Wisconsin must go to the NCG.



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Texas Kelly
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#4 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.01
Ladies and gentlemen, the following public service message is brought to you by your friends from D-Generation X, who would like to remind each and every one of you that if you're not down with that, we've got two words for you...

Actually, Zeruel, under the scenario Bucs Fan is suggesting, all three bids would be automatic according to the by-laws (OSU & Wisconsin due to being ranked #1 and #2, and Michigan due to being the conference champion). And there's nothing in the by-laws as far as I can tell that would deal with the conflict this scenario raises. The very section you quote would be in opposition to itself under this scenario, and I have honestly no idea what the BCS would do.

Fortunately, such a scenario is highly unlikely, but it's a question they do need to address for the future. It'd be a good one to send to the e-mail address they have buried at the bottom of the official BCS website (bcsfootballorg@hotmail.com).



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While the switch from Cena to RVD should alleviate some complaints, the inevitability of the belt's return to Cena (note where Summerslam is this year) and the poor initial showing by the new ECW are enough to keep the indicator where it is for now. The pieces are in place, though, especially on RAW, for improvements to be made to the IWC's psyche in the near future.
wmatistic
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#5 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.21
    Originally posted by Texas Kelly
    Actually, Zeruel, under the scenario Bucs Fan is suggesting, all three bids would be automatic according to the by-laws (OSU & Wisconsin due to being ranked #1 and #2, and Michigan due to being the conference champion). And there's nothing in the by-laws as far as I can tell that would deal with the conflict this scenario raises. The very section you quote would be in opposition to itself under this scenario, and I have honestly no idea what the BCS would do.

    Fortunately, such a scenario is highly unlikely, but it's a question they do need to address for the future. It'd be a good one to send to the e-mail address they have buried at the bottom of the official BCS website (bcsfootballorg@hotmail.com).


I don't think it's really in opposition of itself though I get what you mean. The first criteria they must follow for the BCS is take the top two teams and put them against each other. Then is the rule that all conference champs must be selected, unless two other teams from that conference are already in, in which case they cannot be. "regardless of whether they are automatic qualifiers or at-large picks." is the exact wording they use of course.

Maybe it's wording isn't perfect, but it's clear that would be the ruling in this case, as you have to make the selections in the order they list the criteria.
StingArmy
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#6 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.23
    Originally posted by Texas Kelly
    It'd be a good one to send to the e-mail address they have buried at the bottom of the official BCS website (bcsfootballorg@hotmail.com).

Am I the only one who finds it amusing that the Bowl Championship Series uses a free Hotmail email address?

- StingArmy
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#7 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.02
    Originally posted by StingArmy
      Originally posted by Texas Kelly
      It'd be a good one to send to the e-mail address they have buried at the bottom of the official BCS website (bcsfootballorg@hotmail.com).

    Am I the only one who finds it amusing that the Bowl Championship Series uses a free Hotmail email address?

    - StingArmy

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Mr. Boffo
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#8 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.12
So now, if Florida beats Arkansas (in other words, if the top seeds in each conference win their respective championship games), that would leave one at-large spot open, correct? The current At-Large Teams (Top 14), then, are Arkansas, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Louisville, LSU, and Auburn. Who do you see getting the BCS Bid in this case? How does that change the matchups? Here's I think they'd turn out:

National Championship: Ohio State vs. Michigan

Rose Bowl: USC vs. Notre Dame. I agree with you that the Rose Bowl would probably want Notre Dame if Ohio State and Michigan are occupied. Of course this game would be a rematch of a regular season game. There are no laws against that, it's just interesting.

Sugar Bowl: If there are any At-Large spots available, I think that makes this matchup pretty jumbled. The teams with auto-bids that need to be placed in a bowl game are Rutgers and Boise State. Boise State is obviously the red-headed stepchild of this group. The SEC champ plays in this game; I am projecting Florida just because they're ranked highest among SEC teams right now. I can't see an At-Large Big East team being chosen over the Big East champion, so that knocks out West Virginia and Louisville. The other 3 At-Large Teams are all in the SEC. Would the Sugar Bowl want an SEC vs. SEC Matchup? Would they want Florida vs. Arkansas, in a rematch of the SEC Championship? Michigan/Ohio State and USC/Notre Dame are both rematches, so maybe it's not totally out of the question. In the end though, Florida vs. Rutgers is probably the most likely matchup. An undefeated Rutgers team is probably preferable to an At-Large SEC team playing against the SEC Champion.

Orange Bowl: The Orange Bowl will have a low-ranked ACC Champion in it. Either Wake Forest, Maryland, or Georgia Tech. Whichever team it is, it shouldn't affect their opponent. We're down to an At-Large Team, or Boise State. Having an At-Large SEC team doesn't seem as out of place as it would in the Sugar Bowl. In fact, they might very well have more SEC fans than ACC fans in the Orange Bowl if this scenario happened. So let's call this one Wake Forest (or whomever the ACC Champion is) vs. Arkansas (or other At-Large Team). The Big East At-Large teams are a possibility here as well.

Fiesta Bowl: Texas vs. Boise State. And the crowd goes mild. A Texas team that suddenly doesn't seem that good after losing to Kansas State, against the non-BCS conference representative Boise State. Kind of like Pittsburgh vs. Utah in the 2005 Fiesta Bowl. There could also be Nebraska here if they pull the upset over Texas in the championship game.

That's how I see it, anyway.
wmatistic
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#9 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.21
First if Florida beats Arkansas at this point it would be somewhat shocking. The Hogs are playing crazy good right now.

Second, no way they do a USC vs ND rematch. I don't think it'll be a close game at all, but even if it is I think they'll avoid doing it again.
Crimedog
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#10 Posted on | Instant Rating: 0.00
TK, there's no rule limiting a conference to two teams. It's highly unlikely, but possible, that the Big 10 could get three this year. What would have to happen is the Big 10 champion be No. 1 or No. 2, one of the other teams be No. 3 and one be No. 4 AND there be open spots. If a team from a BCS conference is ranked No. 3 or No. 4 and the conference does not have an at-large representative in the championship game and there is a spot open in the BCS, then that team becomes an automatic qualifier.

The relevant sections:

5. If any of the 10 slots remain open after application of provisions 1 through 4, and an at-large team from a conference with an annual automatic berth for its champion is ranked No. 3 in the final BCS Standings, that team will become an automatic qualifier, provided that no at-large team from the same conference qualifies for the national championship game.

6. If any of the 10 slots remain open after application of provisions 1 through 5, and if no team qualifies under paragraph No. 5 and an at-large team from a conference with an annual automatic berth for its champion is ranked No. 4 in the final BCS Standings, that team will become an automatic qualifier provided that no at-large team from the same conference qualifies for the national championship game.

At-Large Teams

If there are fewer than 10 automatic qualifiers, then the bowls will select at-large participants to fill the remaining berths. At at-large team is any Division I-A team that is bowl-eligible and meets the following requirements:

A. Has won at least nine regular-season games, and
B. Is among the top 14 teams in the final BCS Standings.
Note: in order to participate in a BCS Bowl game, a team (i) must be eligible for post-season play under the rules of the NCAA and, if it not an independent, under the rules of its Conference and (ii) must not have imposed sanctions upon itself prohibiting participation in a post-season game for infractions of the rules of the NCAA or the rules of its Conference.

TheBucsFan
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#11 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.24
    Originally posted by Crimedog
    TK, there's no rule limiting a conference to two teams. It's highly unlikely, but possible, that the Big 10 could get three this year. What would have to happen is the Big 10 champion be No. 1 or No. 2, one of the other teams be No. 3 and one be No. 4 AND there be open spots. If a team from a BCS conference is ranked No. 3 or No. 4 and the conference does not have an at-large representative in the championship game and there is a spot open in the BCS, then that team becomes an automatic qualifier.

    The relevant sections:

    5. If any of the 10 slots remain open after application of provisions 1 through 4, and an at-large team from a conference with an annual automatic berth for its champion is ranked No. 3 in the final BCS Standings, that team will become an automatic qualifier, provided that no at-large team from the same conference qualifies for the national championship game.

    6. If any of the 10 slots remain open after application of provisions 1 through 5, and if no team qualifies under paragraph No. 5 and an at-large team from a conference with an annual automatic berth for its champion is ranked No. 4 in the final BCS Standings, that team will become an automatic qualifier provided that no at-large team from the same conference qualifies for the national championship game.

    At-Large Teams

    If there are fewer than 10 automatic qualifiers, then the bowls will select at-large participants to fill the remaining berths. At at-large team is any Division I-A team that is bowl-eligible and meets the following requirements:

    A. Has won at least nine regular-season games, and
    B. Is among the top 14 teams in the final BCS Standings.
    Note: in order to participate in a BCS Bowl game, a team (i) must be eligible for post-season play under the rules of the NCAA and, if it not an independent, under the rules of its Conference and (ii) must not have imposed sanctions upon itself prohibiting participation in a post-season game for infractions of the rules of the NCAA or the rules of its Conference.




I don't see anything there that denounces the clause quoted by Zereul:


    All teams earning automatic berths must be selected. No more than two teams from any single Conference may play in BCS games in a single year, regardless of whether they are automatic qualifiers or at-large picks.


In fact, that pretty much is in direct conflict with your assessment that "there's no rule limiting a conference to two teams."

That still doesn't definitively answer my question of what would happen in the scenario I described, but I'm still pretty sure no conference can have more than two bids the way things are now. All those rules are saying is that an at-large team ranked No. 3 or No. 4 gets an automatic bid, provided they are the highest-ranked at-large team from their conference ... I think.
Crimedog
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#12 Posted on | Instant Rating: 0.00
    Originally posted by TheBucsFan
      Originally posted by Crimedog
      TK, there's no rule limiting a conference to two teams. It's highly unlikely, but possible, that the Big 10 could get three this year. What would have to happen is the Big 10 champion be No. 1 or No. 2, one of the other teams be No. 3 and one be No. 4 AND there be open spots. If a team from a BCS conference is ranked No. 3 or No. 4 and the conference does not have an at-large representative in the championship game and there is a spot open in the BCS, then that team becomes an automatic qualifier.

      The relevant sections:

      5. If any of the 10 slots remain open after application of provisions 1 through 4, and an at-large team from a conference with an annual automatic berth for its champion is ranked No. 3 in the final BCS Standings, that team will become an automatic qualifier, provided that no at-large team from the same conference qualifies for the national championship game.

      6. If any of the 10 slots remain open after application of provisions 1 through 5, and if no team qualifies under paragraph No. 5 and an at-large team from a conference with an annual automatic berth for its champion is ranked No. 4 in the final BCS Standings, that team will become an automatic qualifier provided that no at-large team from the same conference qualifies for the national championship game.

      At-Large Teams

      If there are fewer than 10 automatic qualifiers, then the bowls will select at-large participants to fill the remaining berths. At at-large team is any Division I-A team that is bowl-eligible and meets the following requirements:

      A. Has won at least nine regular-season games, and
      B. Is among the top 14 teams in the final BCS Standings.
      Note: in order to participate in a BCS Bowl game, a team (i) must be eligible for post-season play under the rules of the NCAA and, if it not an independent, under the rules of its Conference and (ii) must not have imposed sanctions upon itself prohibiting participation in a post-season game for infractions of the rules of the NCAA or the rules of its Conference.




    I don't see anything there that denounces the clause quoted by Zereul:


      All teams earning automatic berths must be selected. No more than two teams from any single Conference may play in BCS games in a single year, regardless of whether they are automatic qualifiers or at-large picks.


    In fact, that pretty much is in direct conflict with your assessment that "there's no rule limiting a conference to two teams."

    That still doesn't definitively answer my question of what would happen in the scenario I described, but I'm still pretty sure no conference can have more than two bids the way things are now. All those rules are saying is that an at-large team ranked No. 3 or No. 4 gets an automatic bid, provided they are the highest-ranked at-large team from their conference ... I think.


Hmmmm...that's interesting. I probably shouldn't be surprised that the BCS contradicts itself within the span of about three paragraphs.

I wonder, however, if the BCS championship is considered a "BCS game" for these purposes. That would be a neat little loophole around the whole thing.


wmatistic
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#13 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.21
    Originally posted by TheBucsFan
    That still doesn't definitively answer my question of what would happen in the scenario I described, but I'm still pretty sure no conference can have more than two bids the way things are now. All those rules are saying is that an at-large team ranked No. 3 or No. 4 gets an automatic bid, provided they are the highest-ranked at-large team from their conference ... I think.


I thought I kinda answered that, but let's see if I can explain it better. The rules must be applied in the order they are listed so the number one and two teams playing each other is the first rule.

Then comes the paragraph you quoted, which again is worded poorly but still clearly states that even if you are an automatic qualifier, you cannot be selected if there are already two teams from your conference in. So the conference champ would have to be left out by rule in your scenario.
TheBucsFan
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#14 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.24
    Originally posted by wmatistic
      Originally posted by TheBucsFan
      That still doesn't definitively answer my question of what would happen in the scenario I described, but I'm still pretty sure no conference can have more than two bids the way things are now. All those rules are saying is that an at-large team ranked No. 3 or No. 4 gets an automatic bid, provided they are the highest-ranked at-large team from their conference ... I think.


    I thought I kinda answered that, but let's see if I can explain it better. The rules must be applied in the order they are listed so the number one and two teams playing each other is the first rule.

    Then comes the paragraph you quoted, which again is worded poorly but still clearly states that even if you are an automatic qualifier, you cannot be selected if there are already two teams from your conference in. So the conference champ would have to be left out by rule in your scenario.


You did answer it, but the part I don't understand is why it's the conference champ in that scenario that gets booted. The part I wasn't sure about, that you just cleared up, is that the order in which the automatic bids is listed determines just how "automatic" they are. So Nos. 1 and 2 are the first priority, then the conference champs.
Crimedog
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#15 Posted on | Instant Rating: 0.00
    Originally posted by wmatistic
      Originally posted by TheBucsFan
      That still doesn't definitively answer my question of what would happen in the scenario I described, but I'm still pretty sure no conference can have more than two bids the way things are now. All those rules are saying is that an at-large team ranked No. 3 or No. 4 gets an automatic bid, provided they are the highest-ranked at-large team from their conference ... I think.


    I thought I kinda answered that, but let's see if I can explain it better. The rules must be applied in the order they are listed so the number one and two teams playing each other is the first rule.

    Then comes the paragraph you quoted, which again is worded poorly but still clearly states that even if you are an automatic qualifier, you cannot be selected if there are already two teams from your conference in. So the conference champ would have to be left out by rule in your scenario.


Hmmmm...so if you apply the rules in order, then it would be possible for a conference to get three teams in _ as long as only one of them is in the championship game. So the relevant rules would go in this order:

Rule 1: No. 1 and No. 2 go to the championship game. (Theoretically speaking this year, No. 1 OSU and No. 2, say, Florida.)
Rule 2: If a team is ranked No. 3 (say, Michigan) and there's an open spot, and the conference doesn't have an at-large team in the championship game, then Michigan is an automatic qualifier.
Rule 3: If a team is ranked No. 4 (say, Wisconsin), and there's an open spot, and the conference doesn't have an at-large team in the championship game, then Wisconsin is an automatic qualifier.
Rule 4: No more than two teams from the same conference can be in the BCS.

So, if the rules are applied from the top down, so to speak, then the automatic qualifier rules would supersede the only two teams rule.
wmatistic
Andouille








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#16 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.21
    Originally posted by Crimedog
      Originally posted by wmatistic
        Originally posted by TheBucsFan
        That still doesn't definitively answer my question of what would happen in the scenario I described, but I'm still pretty sure no conference can have more than two bids the way things are now. All those rules are saying is that an at-large team ranked No. 3 or No. 4 gets an automatic bid, provided they are the highest-ranked at-large team from their conference ... I think.


      I thought I kinda answered that, but let's see if I can explain it better. The rules must be applied in the order they are listed so the number one and two teams playing each other is the first rule.

      Then comes the paragraph you quoted, which again is worded poorly but still clearly states that even if you are an automatic qualifier, you cannot be selected if there are already two teams from your conference in. So the conference champ would have to be left out by rule in your scenario.


    Hmmmm...so if you apply the rules in order, then it would be possible for a conference to get three teams in _ as long as only one of them is in the championship game. So the relevant rules would go in this order:

    Rule 1: No. 1 and No. 2 go to the championship game. (Theoretically speaking this year, No. 1 OSU and No. 2, say, Florida.)
    Rule 2: If a team is ranked No. 3 (say, Michigan) and there's an open spot, and the conference doesn't have an at-large team in the championship game, then Michigan is an automatic qualifier.
    Rule 3: If a team is ranked No. 4 (say, Wisconsin), and there's an open spot, and the conference doesn't have an at-large team in the championship game, then Wisconsin is an automatic qualifier.
    Rule 4: No more than two teams from the same conference can be in the BCS.

    So, if the rules are applied from the top down, so to speak, then the automatic qualifier rules would supersede the only two teams rule.


First, the section regarding who is an auto qualifier and who is an at large team is not the same as the section regarding who CAN be picked and in what order. The section you take from at first in 1-3 is the "who is an auto qualifier and who isn't section". Then move down to the selection order section and you come across the 1 vs 2, followed by no more than two teams. So it's kinda confusing (BCS confusing? Shocking), but still stands as only two teams period.

(edited by wmatistic on 17.11.06 1303)
Quezzy
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#17 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.57
What happens if say Ohio State wins this week and Michigan drops and USC moves up to #2? Does Michigan then take the Rose Bowl spot? And if so would Notre Dame still go to the Rose Bowl for a very uninteresting rematch? I sure hope the loser of Michigan/Ohio State drops because I find the current projected matchups to be kind of lackluster and would rather see Ohio State take on Florida, USC, Rutgers or Arkansas and Michigan play Florida, USC, Rutgers, Arkansas or Texas.



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wmatistic
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#18 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.21
    Originally posted by Quezzy
    What happens if say Ohio State wins this week and Michigan drops and USC moves up to #2? Does Michigan then take the Rose Bowl spot? And if so would Notre Dame still go to the Rose Bowl for a very uninteresting rematch? I sure hope the loser of Michigan/Ohio State drops because I find the current projected matchups to be kind of lackluster and would rather see Ohio State take on Florida, USC, Rutgers or Arkansas and Michigan play Florida, USC, Rutgers, Arkansas or Texas.


Well if a bowl game has it's traditional team taken for the national title game then it's gets first pick of all other teams before any other picks are made. I would think they would want Michigan in that spot but I don't know for sure.
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