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27.8.14 1413
The W - Music - Danger Mouse Presents: THE GREY ALBUM (Page 2)
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rockstar
Salami








Since: 2.1.02
From: East TN

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#21 Posted on | Instant Rating: 6.22

Bitchfactor is right. The old guard always hates the new guard. No one wants to be replaced.

Sampling is an oft discussed topic in music circles because it runs the gambit from incredibly clever/obscure uses that you'd never even notice if no one told you to rappers simply cutting vocals over an old music track. For all intents and purposes, that's how rap began: the Sugar Hill Gang recorded "Rapper's Delight" over Chic's "Celebration" bassline. IMO, if a sample is clever and obscure and the foundation rather than the whole freakin' house, what's the difference between that and, say, Oasis tweaking a note or two of a T-Rex song to create "Cigarettes and Alcohol?" Not much, really. What it comes down to, again, in my opinion, is whether or not it sounds like the artist is just rapping over someone else's song or not.

As far as the veracity of sampling goes, musicians have been ripping one another off since time immemorial. This is absolutely nothing new. Maybe sampling is lazier, but that's about it.

To the work itself, the Grey Album is solid sonically; it sounds crisp and smooth. Aesthetically, it's so-so. Not something I'll spin often, probably, but if you dig Jay-Z this won't disappoint, I don't think.

I didn't care for Rolling Stone referring to it as "oddly ahead of it's time." If you can tell that something is ahead of it's time when it first appears, it's probably not. And I fear that by "ahead of it's time" they mean it won't be long before many more classic albums will be remixed to provide the beats for other rap albums.

Not that I have a problem with that concept; I think the idea here of combining Jay-Z's "Black Album" with the Beatles' "White Album" to create a "Grey Album" is pretty damned clever so long as it works, which it seems to. (That gives me the idea to mix Sticky Fingaz "Black Trash: The Autobiography of Kirk Jones" with the Rolling Stones' "Sticky Fingers.")

The problem I do have is the source material. DangerMouse built an album out of the Beatles' "White Album" and Jay-Z's "Black Album" and people think it's good? No fucking shit. He combined one of the more respected albums by the most respected band of all time with one of the most popular rappers around. Of course it's good. Melt down two bricks of gold and you can make a bigger brick of gold. Take a Andy Gibb record and Hammer's "Funky Headhunter" and let's see how creative DangerMouse really is.

I realize DangerMouse claims he had no intent to profit directly from this album, but look at all the press he's getting because of it. You could say he didn't see this coming, but if he didn't he's an idiot. Record labels have a long, long history of using legal means to get their money; John Fogerty was sued for ripping HIMSELF off. So this was definitely a great PR move on his part, intentional or not (not).

My concern is what happens in the wake of this. The record industry is notorious for rehashing one good idea over and over until it's dead and I certainly wasn't serious about Sticky Fingaz meeting the Stones or Andy Gibb meeting M.C. Hammer, but similar results are a definite possibility.



CRZ
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Since: 9.12.01
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#22 Posted on | Instant Rating: 8.65
postmortem/fallout:



...and many more...



CRZ
InVerse
Bierwurst








Since: 26.8.02

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#23 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.06
It makes me smile to see that the Blogathon, an online event that requires actual effort, had more than twice as many participants as Grey Tuesday.

I'm sure it opened the eyes of the music industry though. If 170 sites of of the several million currently online can all band together for 24 hours, then it clearly shows... something, I'm sure.

It's kind of cute how they claim success based on the fact that more people were willing to download an album for free than go to the store and buy one. Now let's see how well that translates to actual new fans.
drjayphd
Scrapple
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Since: 22.4.02
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#24 Posted on | Instant Rating: 6.56
You wanted the best, you got... Out of Context Quote of the Week. "EMBRACE THE PENIS! LOVE THE PENIS! THE PENIS IS YOUR BEST FRIEND! Be..... the penis." (DEAN)
Well, it's not like it would have sold for any more than five bucks, InVerse.

So, anyway, I'm going off of one of the more popular sources (BitTorrent, by way of seren.net's torrent) for this, and I'm getting the whole thing in one file. Problem is there's no extension. How do I go about finding out what kind of file it is?



DEAN's Nuggets of Wisdom:

"A-Train could wear a Vampirella outfit and I would toast a load to it."
CRZ
Big Brother
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Since: 9.12.01
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#25 Posted on | Instant Rating: 8.65
    Originally posted by InVerse
    It makes me smile to see that the Blogathon, an online event that requires actual effort, had more than twice as many participants as Grey Tuesday.

    I'm sure it opened the eyes of the music industry though. If 170 sites of of the several million currently online can all band together for 24 hours, then it clearly shows... something, I'm sure.

    It's kind of cute how they claim success based on the fact that more people were willing to download an album for free than go to the store and buy one. Now let's see how well that translates to actual new fans.
ZOOM



CRZ
InVerse
Bierwurst








Since: 26.8.02

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#26 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.06
    Originally posted by CRZ
    ZOOM


I apologize if my dislike of a bunch of whiny brats came off as missing the point of your insignificant little protest. I'm glad you feel you did the right thing by defying the evil corporation. I hope this means that anything you ever create is available for the public to use in whatever way they feel is appropriate.
Guru Zim
SQL Dejection
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Since: 9.12.01
From: Bay City, OR

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#27 Posted on | Instant Rating: 8.83
    Originally posted by InVerse
      Originally posted by CRZ
      ZOOM


    I apologize if my dislike of a bunch of whiny brats came off as missing the point of your insignificant little protest. I'm glad you feel you did the right thing by defying the evil corporation. I hope this means that anything you ever create is available for the public to use in whatever way they feel is appropriate.


I just want to understand - you don't agree with us so you get to be a jerk?

I'm pretty sure that's not how this works.

The blogathon was so significant that I never heard about it. Now, I'm not the measurement of everything to everyone, but I do feel that I'm pretty aware of life in general. Dear Lord, I think I just spoke in lyrics from an Oasis album...

My point is: We did something yesterday for an interesting cause. 43032 pages were served from our site yesterday. Hopefully, a few of those people were interested and checked out the site.

Do you agree with the message? Frankly, I don't care - it's not about you.


(edited by Guru Zim on 25.2.04 1930)


Willful ignorance of science is not commendable. Refusing to learn the difference between a credible source and a shill is criminally stupid.
ges7184
Lap cheong








Since: 7.1.02
From: Birmingham, AL

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#28 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.04
Looking through the thread, many point out that he did not sell the album, and I still don't know why that matters. Say you steal my rake. It's still stolen whether you turn around and sell it to somebody for profit or not. The same thing would apply if you steal a rake from me and a shovel from my neighbor and turn around and create some new awesome tool out of the two.

The only thing I can think of is that it (noncommercial) is one of the qualifiers for "fair use". However, it's this part:

"the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright."

I just don't find the qualification here for this album. The one legal opinion tried to use criticism, claiming the album was criticizing the record company's defense of its copyright that stymies new kinds of music. Well heck, if that's the case, couldn't anybody claim that for their own remixes, recreations, whatever. In which case, the copyright itself is pretty much rendered useless.



Everything that is wrong in this world can be blamed on Freddie Prinze Jr.
InVerse
Bierwurst








Since: 26.8.02

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#29 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.05
    Originally posted by Guru Zim
    I just want to understand - you don't agree with us so you get to be a jerk?

    I'm pretty sure that's not how this works.


Well, I don't have the benefit of being able to delete anything I don't want to see, so I go with the next best option.
Guru Zim
SQL Dejection
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Since: 9.12.01
From: Bay City, OR

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#30 Posted on | Instant Rating: 8.83
Two points:

1) Infringement of copyright is not stealing. One is criminal, one is civil. This is argued to death on Slashdot, I'd be better off just linking to one of thousands of posts that says this there.

2) Infringement is completley defined by the law - it is illegal because the law makes it illegal. If we could get the laws changed, it would not be illegal. Part of the point of the protest yesterday (better expressed by others) was that the law is not art friendly.



Willful ignorance of science is not commendable. Refusing to learn the difference between a credible source and a shill is criminally stupid.
CRZ
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Since: 9.12.01
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#31 Posted on | Instant Rating: 8.65
    Originally posted by InVerse
      Originally posted by Guru Zim
      I just want to understand - you don't agree with us so you get to be a jerk?

      I'm pretty sure that's not how this works.


    Well, I don't have the benefit of being able to delete anything I don't want to see, so I go with the next best option.
Now you're the guy who dislikes whiny brats, right? 1/2 ;-)

You know, I *thought* I wrote a pretty good response to your first post - I tried to include a lot of links to a lot of examples of what I was talking about and tried to explain why I'd done what I'd done. Your response suggested to me that you weren't really interested in any of what I was presenting, moving back to the profit argument and adding the cherry on top of an appeal to emotion (the "fucking his wife behind his back" comment). So I opted out of your branch of this thread. Other people picked up other points and before you knew it we had a pretty interesting discussion.

Your THIRD post, belittling the entirety of the protest and even attempting a smug comparison to a...blogathon?, demonstrated beyond the shadow of doubt that not only were you miles away from taking anything comprehensive from what happened, but you weren't even particularly interested in learning about the issue at all. I thought you earned a ZOOM for that, and I gave it to you.

Your FOURTH post is more belittling with a non-sequitur on top. If you were REALLY interested, I might be bothered to explain my stance on my copyright - which I believe you could probably glean from the years I have been writing if you cared to do so - but by this point in the thread it was abundantly clear that you really had no business being in this thread after ignoring my answer to your questions.

Your FIFTH post - and keep in mind, if I haven't made it clear yet, I'm saying you probably should have stopped after the first two - contains nothing more than a thinly veiled slam at the admins, possibly because by now both of them have you on their radar and perhaps you're interested in seeing how far we'll let you hang out before you ARE hanged.

I believe that sums it up. The sad part is I've spent way too long crafting THIS response when what I could have been doing is talking about the Grey Album, or the JAMS, or anything REMOTELY related to music I enjoy and would like to share with every reader of this thread - that's my mistake and I'm sure I'll pay my own penance later.



CRZ
Ruby Trax
Summer sausage








Since: 10.12.01
From: The KZiM Tower

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#32 Posted on | Instant Rating: 8.25
I know it's EMI and not the Beatles who are firing up their cease and desist orders, but since so many seem to be sensitive to artists' rights, we can further place this issue in historical context by recalling that the Beatles were among the first pop acts to use musique concrete/tape loops, a precursor to sampling, in their recordings. It's one of the elements that cemented the Beatles' reputations as groundbreaking artists, and fairly universally beloved ones at that.

* Influenced by Karlheinz Stockhausen, Paul McCartney once considered making a recording simply by laying Beatles music over the music of a classical composer sometime in the '60s. This is a weird tidbit that's been sticking in my consciousness for ages so I can't remember where I got it from, but an interesting essay on McCartney's fascination with tape looping here brings it up and specifies that the composer in question was Beethoven.

* The Beatles' "Revolution #9" features tape loops taken from recordings of pieces by Sibelius and Beethoven. (A breakdown of the elements used in the recording can be found here.)

* Producer George Martin describes the use of borrowed elements, both recorded and otherwise, in the recording of "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite" from Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band in a 1971 interview with Melody Maker:

John got the idea of that from an actual poster - he often pinched things like that for his songs - and I thought it was a great idea. When he came to record it he said he wanted to convey the impression of sawdust in the ring, to give the idea of a fairground and a circus. So I started working out my electronic sounds to make it just that. I got lots and lots of steam-organ sounds, genuine calliope noises, which are tapes of "Liberty Bell," Sousa marches, that kind of thing. I spent the morning with an engineer, put them all on one tape, and asked him to cut them up into sections 15 inches long, which is about a second in length. He did that and they were all in a row on the desk. I said "Now throw them in the air and pick 'em up and join 'em together." Inevitably some were backwards and some were forwards, and when we played it back it was a terrible mish-mash of sounds. ... it was a sound picture thing and I was doing really what I'd been doing with Peter Sellers, building up a little picture. Most of John's writing at that time was coming from little observations, like seeing the poster. The "Day In The Life" thing, the controversial bit about holes in the road which a lot of American journalists thought were puncture marks in your skin, was an extract from the Daily Mail. (Full text of interview can be found here.)

I'm sure there are plenty more examples to be found elsewhere but the point is, the Beatles themselves have set an example, if not a standard, as to the aesthetic benefits of using other artists' works toward the formation of a new creative order.



I am made of blue sky and golden light, and I will feel this way forever.
CRZ
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Since: 9.12.01
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#33 Posted on | Instant Rating: 8.65
    Originally posted by bitchfactor
    I'm sure there are plenty more examples to be found elsewhere but the point is, the Beatles themselves have set an example, if not a standard, as to the aesthetic benefits of using other artists' works toward the formation of a new creative order.
Oh, that reminds me... excerpt from an excerpt of William Poundstone's Big Secrets as found on http://www.crispen.org/rants/secrets.html - with a lovely header about fair use which I reproduce here:

The following is exerpted from: Big Secrets. William Poundstone, ISBN# 0-688-04830-7. William Morrow and Company, Inc., 105 Madison Ave., New York, NY 10016 (c) 1983 by Wm. Poundstone. The copyright act of 1976 (17 U.S.C. sections 101-810, public law 94-553) states that a chapter from a book is considered fair use of the material. In addition, the guideline at Emory states (among other requirements) that no more than 50 pages can be copied. This falls far below that number. (Since I'm using the computer at work, albeit on my own time, I felt that stuff was necessary.) If you copy it or share it, keep this attached. ### NOTE THE (c) DATE. SOME INFO MAY BE OUTDATED OR FLAT OUT WRONG. ### Go buy William's book, it's nifty. <---gratis plug for which I get no $. That said, let me limber up my typing fingers and have at it! -- Malinda McCall.


SECRET MESSAGES ON RECORDS

...

RUMOR: The fadeout contains several lines from King Lear. According to The Beatles A to Z by Goldie Friede, Robin Titone, and Sue Weiner (New York: Methuen, 1980), Lennon taped the lines from a BBC radio production
and did not even know what play it was until years later.

FINDINGS: Right and left stereo tracks of the ending were compared, but there was little difference. There seem to be four vocal components to the ending of "I Am the Walrus":


  1. A chanted "Goo goo goo joob"--which is in the published lyric and is taken from Finnegan's Wake.
  2. Another chant that seems to be "Oom pah, oom pah."
  3. A third chant that has been identified as "Everybody's got one,", beginning approximately when the "Goo goo goo joob" chant dies away.*
  4. The lines from King Lear [almost drowned out by chant #3.]


    OSWALD
    Slave, thou hast slain me. Villain, take my purse:
    If ever thou wilt thrive, bury my body,
    And give the letters which thou find'st about me
    To Edmund, Earl of Glocester, seek him out
    Upon the English party. Oh, untimely death!

    Death!
    EDGAR
    I know thee well. A serviceable villain,
    As duteous to the vices of thy mistress
    As badness would desire.
    GLOUCESTER
    What, is he dead?
    EDGAR
    Sit you down, Father, rest you.




On Friday, 29 September 1967, a radio was tuned in to the BBC's Third Programme and some lines from a production of The Tragedy of King Lear were included on the track. - from http://www.cafedewalrus.nl/Iamthewalrus.htm

And now for something completel different... if anyone is STILL interested in the plunderphonics culture, one more website you might want to check out is http://detritus.net/. Navigation is a pain but there's good stuff to mine if you're so inclined and unafraid to do some clicking around.



CRZ
Nag
Landjager








Since: 10.1.03
From: Enter your city here

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#34 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.52
I'm very critical of the music industry, but I too take their side on this issue.

I'm not proficient enough with computers and the like to know how open you are with very this board, or the possibilities involved. But if someone with the knowhow took the coding and such for this board which you guys have worked hard weeks, months, years on; and created their own, would you at all feel cheated? It would your right, and rightfully so, to take action to stop it, as it would be your right to allow them to do so.

As if I were to work weeks, months, years to put together one of the most recognized albums in history, I would feel cheated if someone decided to take it upon themselves to capitalize on my success without my permission. To the extent that Jay-z or MightyMouse, are using the Beatles, Image, success, and music; I would surely take action if I were them, Micheal Jackson, BMI, whatever. It's just so blatant, from the cover, down to what is described as the music. And to me, that is just as bad if one were walk into the 7-11 with an empty wallet, yet walk out with a week of groceries.

Why not use your own creative talents, Image, to forge something more unique. Rather then just use a few million dollars of computer equipment to rehash anothers art, anothers elses emotions?


Leroy
Andouille








Since: 7.2.02
From: Huntington, NY

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#35 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.97
    Originally posted by Nag
    I'm not proficient enough with computers and the like to know how open you are with very this board, or the possibilities involved. But if someone with the knowhow took the coding and such for this board which you guys have worked hard weeks, months, years on; and created their own, would you at all feel cheated? It would your right, and rightfully so, to take action to stop it, as it would be your right to allow them to do so.


There are entire models based on the very concept you are criticizing here. Open publishing have been around a LONG while. Chances are, if the open source model did not exist, the internet would be a much different place.

As far as music goes, hip hop takes far more heat for sampling than it should. Everyone seems to forget that "sampling", in some form, existed in Western classical music for a long time - where it was considered a form of flattery to use some else's themes an write variations (there is a scene in Amadeus between Mozart and Salieri, "I did some variations on a piece of yours . . . a funny little tune, but it yielded some good things.")

This was all before money became the bottom line, and the advancement of art was important.





"He's like Billy Joel, if Billy Joel didn't suck."
- Ted C. on Jonathan Richman
thecubsfan
Scrapple
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Since: 10.12.01
From: Aurora, IL

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#36 Posted on | Instant Rating: 10.00
>And to me, that is just as bad if one were walk into the
>7-11 with an empty wallet, yet walk out with a week of
>groceries

This analogy is kin to saying "because DJ Danger Mouse put out the Gray Album, every dollar spent by consumers on that it a dollar that would've been spent on the Beatles/JayZ", and I can't imagine that being true

DangerMouse isn't taking the groceries* out of the corner store. He's buying groceries (he did pay for the original CDs, I presume), then taking them back to his mad lab to create wacky combinations of food items (banapple! a bologna and rocky road sandwich! a lite beer that doesn't suck! insert evil mad scientist laugh here), and then giving a copy of his wacky creations to whoever drops by.

I do not argue the coolness of banapples, but, if I still want a nice Washington Apple, I'm still going to the corner Beatles grocery.



thecubsfan.com - CMLLBlog
Zeruel
Thirty Millionth Hit
Moderator








Since: 2.1.02
From: The Silver Spring in the Land of Mary.

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#37 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.05
Nag -- TheCubsFan has a point. So does This writer who did a legal analysis for the EFF (Eletronic Frontier Foundation)

He states "downloads of the Grey Album do not substitute for purchases of the White Album" therefore, it falls under fair use. The album is changed so far from the source material that he wouldn't be taking away sales from the White Album. Now, if he just added a bonus track to the White Album, and tried to sell or otherwise release it, that's different.

From that writer, the Grey Tuesday people have a good legal leg to stand on.

One other excerpt:

    Originally posted by EFF

    Does EMI have a case?
    There is no federal copyright protection for sound recordings made before 1972. Because the White Album was released in 1968, it appears that EMI has no federal copyright rights in the sound recording. Some record labels have argued that "digital remastering" creates a new work, protected under federal copyright laws. There don't appear to be any cases supporting this view, however, where a simple transfer to CD is involved.

    Because federal copyright law does not protect the sound recording of the White Album, the usual federal copyright law remedies (statutory damages up to $150,000 per work infringed, relaxed standards for preliminary injunctions, attorneys fees) also do not apply.

    State laws, however, may protect sound recordings made before 1972. Many states have their own copyright laws or may apply common law doctrines to protect sound recordings from misappropriation. The rights and remedies are likely to vary from state to state.



ges7184 -- The difference between your rake being stolen and EMIs is that your's is real. When it's gone, you can't use it. EMI's rake is digital. They still have it and can use it as much as they want, copy it ad infinito and make a packet. DJDM didn't sell his new remixed rake and just wanted to fiddle around with it to see what he could do.


(edited by rikidozan on 26.2.04 0308)


The Catastrophic Annihilation War Room

Nag
Landjager








Since: 10.1.03
From: Enter your city here

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#38 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.52
Leroy-I'm aware of that, and having some knowledge of the contributions of the open source community, how could I dare criticize. But in a capitalist country, I feel I have to respect the Bill Gates of the world as much as I respect the Linus Torvolds. Who I would rather take out for a beer, well that's an entire different question. I'm just stressing the choices of the of the copyright holder, which in this case it is kinda of blurry and unconventional, yet given the debate (EDIT)the who in this case(END) is irrelevant.

Riki and Cubs, maybe it wasn't the best analogy, but I will stand behind the premise. A purchase of a CD cannot be a substitute for the purchase of a catalog. He has the right to listen to that CD as he pleases, but that don't give him the right to distribute that album or in this case aspects of that album. We are doing Apples and Oranges with our food analogies, but given the overtness of this, I would argue he is selling those banapples in an Oscar Myer package.





(edited by Nag on 26.2.04 0634)

(edited by Nag on 26.2.04 0637)
tarnish
Frankfurter








Since: 13.2.02
From: Back in the Heart of Hali

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#39 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.03
Classical musicians wrote variations on the tunes of others.

Jazz musicians will often "quote" another musician's playing in their own.

Painters have long copied the work of others and sold it as their own. Does the estate of Van Gogh get the royalties from all the posters of "Starry Night?" Or does some faceless corporation who picked up the copyright for a song 50 years ago get it?

Fuck, I mean, do you think all the stories in Homer's Odyssey came out of his brain and his brain alone? None of it would have meant nearly so much if that were the case. Did the Greeks tax performances of Homer? Should they have?

I know the Bible's not copyrighted, but if it were, Gibson's new movie about the Christ myth would be in violation. By strict letter of the law, so too would many Christmas Pageants.

Artistic "performance" or "creation" is about the synthesis of one's own ideas with the realities of the world around one. Part of the realities of the world around one are the performances and creations of others that have come before.

If we limit the artists to only what can be proven to be totally non-derivative in any way we will rob our global culture of anything vaguely art-like in a depressingly short period of time.

Copyright is a disease. It is good to reward artists for their work and to keep people from making cheap or purely derivative copies that are sold as original work. It is cultural suicide to insist that an artist must have been working in a vacuum to come up with a work and so nobody should ever be allowed to do anything even vaguely like work without paying money to the artist who made it.

DangerMouse took two disparate works from disparate time periods and cultures and worked them together using his own skill, ability, and vision into something that stands on its own as art. Frankly, that's enough for me. It certainly beats the snot out of the "production team" that puts together the most generic possible beats, tones, and lyrics for the latest chart-topping flash-in-the-pan.



/tarnish...

[the GPL is] not just a crazy idea that some lefty Commie hippie dreamed up in a drug-induced stupor.
-- Linus Torvalds
Dr Unlikely
Frankfurter








Since: 2.1.02

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#40 Posted on | Instant Rating: 9.34
Being a Beatles nerd, I'm following the subdiscussion about things the Beatles (and/or McCartney) have let be sampled and things that they used in their own songs a bit more than the legal/illegal aspect of The Grey Album, though I suppose they connect. So I hope I'm not knocking this off course.

While they were able to use the Mr. Kite pipe organ and calliope loops, I guess, because they were catalog music owned by the studio, they did get nailed themselves for sampling-before-it-was-sampling. They were sued over "All You Need Is Love" for George Martin's arrangement having the orchestra play a part of "In the Mood," which turned out to be neither something they already had the rights to (like "She Loves You," which turns up in the end) nor something (as Martin thought) that was in public domain already, like the other music that turns up in the song ("Greensleeves" and "The Marseillaise" and the Bach piece.)

If I'm not mistaken, the case was that "In the Mood" itself wasn't still under copyright, but the Glenn Miller arrangement of it was. EMI had to settle it by paying a royalty settlement to the copyright holder. On the other side of things, they didn't get into any legal trouble on "It's All Too Much," but Harrison does sing two lines from The Merseys' "Sorrow" (well, one line twice) and bits of The Prince of Denmark March are played on trumpets at the end.

I'd like to talk about what from The White Album was used, and how it was used and fits in with The Black Album, and all that sort or thing, but I've only heard parts of The Grey Album songs once and didn't really get to form any solid opinions. I thought the one song ("Change Clothes" I think?) that used "Piggies" was the most immediately interesting, musically. Can't go wrong with hip hop and harpsichords, right?
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Heck yeah, Local H. "Bound For the Floor" still gets much play in my car. I love that song...good to see they're back.
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