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The W - One Question... - Read any good books lately? (Page 7)
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Shem the Penman
Toulouse








Since: 16.1.02
From: The Off-Center of the Universe (aka Philadelphia)

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#121 Posted on | Instant Rating: 1.00
Now working through the latest doorstop in Steven Erikson's "Malazan Books of the Fallen" series, Toll the Hounds. (Incidentally, if anyone is thinking of giving the series a try -- the second book, Deadhouse Gates, is much, much better than the first, Gardens of the Moon. Much.)

Best books I've read this year -- probably John Crowley's "Aegypt" series, although I still have yet to read the last one, Endless Things.



"The object of persecution is persecution. The object of torture is torture. The object of power is power. Now do you begin to understand me?"
samoflange
Lap cheong








Since: 22.2.04
From: Cambridge, MA

Since last post: 369 days
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#122 Posted on | Instant Rating: 6.20
Good Omens, but Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett.
This was a humorous look at what the Christian version of the Apocalypse would be like, complete with an 11 year old, all powerful Antichrist. Not great, but solidly entertaining. Apparently, it's supposed to be very similar to the Hitchhiker's Guide books, but I've never read them so I can't vouch for that claim myself.

I'm about to start the 3 Bourne books. I've only seen the first movie so far, and that was years ago in the theater, so I'm looking forward to reading these and then watching the movies.



Lloyd: When I met Mary, I got that old fashioned romantic feeling, where I'd do anything to bone her.
Harry: That's a special feeling.
Downtown Bookie
Morcilla








Since: 7.4.02
From: The Inner City, Now Living In The Country

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#123 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.57
I've recently finished a trio of books dealing with the Nixon Presidency, a topic made timely with the recent passing of Mark Felt (The W) a.k.a. "Deep Throat". I highly recommend all three.

Very Strange Bedfellows (The W at Amazon) by Jules Witcover concerns the relationship between President Richard Nixon and his first Vice President, Spiro "Ted" Agnew. The book is very well researched, and Witcover does a fine job of relating: the events surrounding Nixon's selection of Agnew as his running mate in 1968; Agnew's tenure as Veep (and his popularity with American Conservatives during that time); Nixon's consideration of dropping Agnew in 1972 in favor of John Connally; and the criminal charges that led to Agnew's resignation in October 1973. However, the meat of the book is the contrast in personalities and styles between the two men; Agnew: smooth-talking; confident; Nixon: insecure; socially awkward. A running theme throughout the book is Nixon expressing what he wants his Veep to do (i.e. handle this task; change the focus of his [Agnew's] rhetoric; don't get involved in this or that issue) to his inner circle (Haldeman and Ehrlichman) but being totally unable to tell Agnew directly what he [Nixon] wants done. Indeed, one is struck by how much Nixon hated one-on-one confrontations, and the torturous lengths he would put himself (and others) through to avoid them. Consider this excerpt from the introduction:
    Originally posted by Jules Witcover
    David Parker, President Nixon's scheduler, informed [John] Damgard [an aide to Vice President Agnew] that Nixon didn't want to attend that year's Gridiron dinner...and wanted Agnew to fill in for him. Damgard dutifully conveyed the message.

    "If the President wants me to substitute for him at the dinner," Damgard later recalled Agnew's telling him, "all he has to do is pick up the phone and ask me. I've never said no to him before, but I'm not going to do it on the basis of your asking me to do it. If the president wants me to do it, that's different."

    Damgard called Parker back and relayed what the vice president had said. Word was passed to H.R. "Bob" Haldeman, Nixon's chief of staff, who informed the president. Exasperated but always avoiding personal confrontation at all costs, Nixon instructed Haldeman to send the same message again. The same reply came back from Agnew through Damgard. It went like that, back and forth.

    "For whatever reason," Damgard recounted later, "Nixon would not pick up the phone and ask Agnew to do it, and this stalemate existed for days and days...."

    More days passed, and finally one afternoon...a uniformed military attache from the White House appeared with an envelope he had been instructed to deliver personally to the vice president only. Admitted to the presence, he handed over the envelope. Inside was a handwritten note from Nixon. It said, as Damgard best recalled later: "Dear Ted. I would very much appreciate your presence at this year's Gridiron dinner. Thanks, Dick." And so Agnew went....

    As Agnew himself recounted the awkward episode later in his memoir, he finally relented only after Nixon had phoned him on a Sunday - a "very unusual" occurrence. "We chatted for about ten minutes on a variety of subjects," Agnew recalled. "he closed by mentioning what a great job one of the cabinet had done on Meet the Press that day. Then he paused a moment and continued about how important TV was. He paused again. I said it certainly was, and that ended our conversation." It was the next afternoon, the vice president remembered, "when I was given a handwritten letter from the president. With charming simplicity, he requested me to attend the Gridiron dinner....Naturally, I went to the dinner."

    Then Agnew wrote: "I really would have enjoyed serving in the vice presidency with Lyndon Johnson, because if anything had gone wrong, probably he himself would have picked up the phone and said, 'Agnew, what the hell are you doing?' Or he would have said, 'I've got a hell of a problem. Come over here. I want to talk to you about this.' Unfortunately, I could have no such man-to-man talk with President Nixon. Absolutely none....He successfully avoided any subject he didn't want to be pinned down on."

The second book, 31 Days by Barry Werth, is an excellent chronicle of the first month of the Gerald Ford administration, beginning August 9, 1974, through September 8, 1974, the day Ford pardoned Nixon. While the Nixon pardon is the dominant theme, this book is much more than that. This is the story of the Watergate aftermath; the healing of the country, and the crises that required immediate attention; both domestic (inflation; fuel shortages) and international, especially those created by countries seeking to exploit the change of power in Washington to a man with practically no foreign policy experience. It's the story of the honeymoon Ford enjoyed with the press, with Congress, and with the American people; a honeymoon that ended abruptly once Ford granted Nixon a full Presidential pardon for all Watergate crimes. The book is well written and well paced, as it puts the reader inside the White House during one of the most calamitous times in United States history.

Finally, there's John Dean's The Rehnquist Choice a look back at the circumstances and events surrounding the four men appointed to the Supreme Court by President Nixon (Blackmun, Burger, Powell and Rehnquist) along with those whom Nixon considered and were either not confirmed by the Senate, or withdrawn prior to a Senate vote. Dean does a fine job of setting the stage and adding his own personal recollections of events, but the bulk of the book (and what makes it well worth the read) are the transcripts of the White House recordings from that time. The central character of the book is Nixon himself, and the reader gets to see President Nixon covertly orchestrating the first two Supreme Court openings during his administration; attempting behind the scenes to drive Justice Douglas from the Court; and all the conferring and political scheming that went into all his Supreme Court nominations (primarily those of Powell and Rehnquist). I would say that this book is worth the read just for the sections on Nixon manipulating Washington in general and the Senate in particular into believing that he was going to nominate Senator Robert Byrd of West Virginia for the Supreme Court. Quoting from the book:
    Originally posted by John Dean
    The reference [in Haldeman's journal] to appointing West Virginia senator Robert Byrd tell much of Nixon's mood. This was his fantasy punishment for the Senate. Byrd was a part of the Senate's Democratic leadership, not because his colleagues loved him, but rather because they either feared or needed him. Byrd's seniority, his mastery of the parliamentary workings of the Senate, and his committee assignments gave him great power....If Nixon were to nominate Byrd, his colleagues would have a problem: they dare not vote against him, for if Byrd was not confirmed they would have to deal with his wrath; yet how could they vote for him when he was totally unqualified? Byrd had never completed his undergraduate education....Byrd had never passed a bar examination, never been admitted to practice anywhere, and never practiced a day of law in his life. Nixon was particularly delighted by the fact that Byrd had once been a member of the Ku Klux Klan. Nominating Byrd to the Supreme Court was the equivalent of throwing a stink bomb into the Senate.
Classic Nixon, using his political genius (and have no doubt about it: Nixon was a political genius) to think up the most underhanded and backdoor method to get even with those who opposed him. This book presents an important piece of American history, and is well worth the read.



http://www.americasupportsyou.mil


"Share your food with the hungry, and give shelter to the homeless. Give clothes to those who need them, and do not hide from relatives who need your help." - Isaiah 58:7 (New Living Translation)
Dexley's Midnight Jogger
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Since: 10.10.02
From: New Hampshire

Since last post: 260 days
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#124 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.46
    Originally posted by Roy.
    At the beach a few weeks ago I did my usual summer trifecta of Michael Connelly (The Closers), Lee Child (One Shot) and John Sandford (Broken Prey). All three are highly recommended, especially Connelly, who keeps getting better and better.


I recently discovered Lee Child and have read six this year, five of them in a row. I love the Reacher novels and can't wait to get the next one. I'm not reading them in order and it doesn't effect them either. Very, very good.
jfkfc
Liverwurst








Since: 9.2.02

Since last post: 96 days
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#125 Posted on | Instant Rating: 6.91
    Originally posted by Dexley's Midnight Jogger
    I recently discovered Lee Child and have read six this year, five of them in a row. I love the Reacher novels and can't wait to get the next one. I'm not reading them in order and it doesn't effect them either. Very, very good.
Funny...my stepfather recommended these to me. I started reading one, got REALLY into it within 100 pages, and when I told him which one I was reading (can't remember which, exactly), he screamed "NONONONONO!" and told me that I had to start with the FIRST one, which I'm still on a waiting list for at the library. I think I'll just go buy a few at the used bookstore and read them in whatever order as you said (and not give the poor old guy a heart attack).

I just finished "Just After Sunset", the newest collection of short stories by Stephen King. There is a story in there called "The Cat From Hell" which may be one of his 5 best short stories EVER!
TheBucsFan
TheChiefsFan








Since: 2.1.02

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#126 Posted on | Instant Rating: 2.33
I just finished "The Language Instinct" by Steven Pinker and "The Symbolic Species" by Terrence Deacon. Both were great books and I would recommend them to anyone with any interest in the subject of language and how humans learn and understand it.

I got into linguistics when I was trying to understand the answer to a pretty simple question: How can grammar or speech be called "incorrect" if the person using it effectively communicates their point? For example, if I say, "I is hungry," and everyone understands that I mean the same thing as "I am hungry," then what's the problem? These books touch on that idea somewhat, but they go beyond that as well and into trying to answer this question: "Why can only humans in the entire animal kingdom understand language in the way they do?"
samoflange
Lap cheong








Since: 22.2.04
From: Cambridge, MA

Since last post: 369 days
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#127 Posted on | Instant Rating: 6.33
In January I read all of Preacher. I had read books 1 through 4 several years ago, but never made it all the way. I'm glad I did, but can also say that the series peaks early on.

Since the holidays, I've been slowly reading a book about New England forests. The authors shows a picture and then describes the various processes that caused the trees and landscape to look the way they do. It sounds dry, but it was really not (really!).
Here's a link: http://www.amazon.com/Reading-Forested-Landscape-Natural-History/dp/0881504203

I'm almost done with Jeff Smith's Bone series. While I can't yet attest to the quality of the ending, it's been tons of fun so far.



Lloyd: When I met Mary, I got that old fashioned romantic feeling, where I'd do anything to bone her.
Harry: That's a special feeling.
Psycho Penguin
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Since: 24.6.07
From: Greenacres FL

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#128 Posted on | Instant Rating: 1.25
I've been catching up on reading finally this year.

Last read - Animal Farm by George Orwell. An incredibly well written story that kept me hooked, but was a little too short unfortunately.

Currently reading - 1984 by George Orwell. I'm a sucker for these kinds of stories (I watched Equilibrium last night for christs sake!) so I am liking this.

Next - Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier. I saw the Hitchcock movie a few weeks ago with my wife and absolutely loved it, and she had the book, so there we go.



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Since: 2.1.02
From: The Las Vegas of Canada

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#129 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.16
I've been reading quite a bit lately. And so far been pretty lucky in choosing books I enjoyed.

Waiter Rant by Steve Dublanica (The W at Amazon) was a snarky, entertaining look at the waiter. Guaranteed to start a debate with your friend who never leaves more than 5% as a tip.

Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain is the spiritual godfather to that book. His shocked and appalled reaction to the rise of the celebrity chef is both self-deprecating and hilarious IMO.

Game Change by John Heileman and Mark Halperin is a must-read if you have any interest in politics. The stories about Sarah Palin's intellect and Hilary Clinton's campaign are jaw-droppers.

Fantasyland by Sam Walker deals with a baseball writer trying to win the self-proclaimed most difficult fantasy baseabll league on earth. Some interesting thoughts on the scouting/stats argument and fun story to boot.

Cowboys Full by James McManus The author of Positively Fifth Street returns with a comprehensive look at the history of poker. A bit bloated and some stories you probably know if you have any interest in the subject but has enough information you probably didn't know to make it worthwhile.

The Godfather of Poker by Doyle Brunson Doyle has had a cooler life than any of us. And here are some of the stories from it.

Check-Raising the Devil by Mike Matusow Mike has had a more interesting life than most of us. Some of it you will be envious of. Some of it you will be glad you never experienced. A very honest look at himself by a man who has been very troubled in his life.

Queen of the Ring by Jeff Leen is a fairly unbiased look at the life of Mildred Burke, the champion female wrestler of the 50's. A very sad story about someone who was both ahead of her time and unable to adapt to the times all at once.



(edited by spf on 19.2.10 1658)


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DrewDewce
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Since: 2.1.02
From: The Derby City

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Y!:
#130 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.77
    Originally posted by Psycho Penguin
    Currently reading - 1984 by George Orwell.


I re-read this a few years ago (I originally read it in 1981 or '82 when I was in 7th grade) and gained even more respect and love for the book. Always neat to re-read things you read at a young age and see if they hold up or if you gain new perspectives on them given education, life experiences, etc. (Works with music albums too). Hope you enjoy it!



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Since: 19.8.05
From: My Old Kentucky Home

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#131 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.57
    Originally posted by DrewDewce
      Originally posted by Psycho Penguin
      Currently reading - 1984 by George Orwell.


    I re-read this a few years ago (I originally read it in 1981 or '82 when I was in 7th grade) and gained even more respect and love for the book. Always neat to re-read things you read at a young age and see if they hold up or if you gain new perspectives on them given education, life experiences, etc. (Works with music albums too). Hope you enjoy it!

One of my favorites as well. Animal Farm also takes on a whole new perspective when you read it years after you were forced to in junior high.

I am trying to get through Moby Dick again now, but man that thing is dense.




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-- Mahatma Gandhi
drjayphd
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Since: 22.4.02
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#132 Posted on | Instant Rating: 6.33
    Originally posted by DrewDewce
      Originally posted by Psycho Penguin
      Currently reading - 1984 by George Orwell.


    I re-read this a few years ago (I originally read it in 1981 or '82 when I was in 7th grade) and gained even more respect and love for the book. Always neat to re-read things you read at a young age and see if they hold up or if you gain new perspectives on them given education, life experiences, etc. (Works with music albums too). Hope you enjoy it!


Just picked up Fahrenheit 451 from a thrift shop a while back, we'll see if it still holds up that well. (Spoiler: probably.)

Last book I finished was Peter Sagal's "The Book of Vice", which is probably better because of the context. The host of an NPR show breaking bread with Nina Hartley, Shane, and Evan Stone (and that's just the last chapter)? Definitely wouldn't be as good if he was just some guy (never mind his own history... "Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights" much?).





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Since: 26.1.03
From: Naples, FL

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#133 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.73
I just finished Vince Russo's new book, "Rope Opera: How WCW Killed Vince Russo."


...so no, I haven't read any good books lately.
wmatistic
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Since: 2.2.04
From: Austin, TX

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#134 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.08
Just finished A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin. Loved this book, can't wait to read the rest of the series.
Whitebacon
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Since: 12.1.02
From: Fresno, CA

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#135 Posted on | Instant Rating: 6.56
I recently bought a Kindle, and have been putting it to good use. I just got done reading the Hitchhikers series of books, and have started Tom Sawyer, and will probably work my way through a good chunk of Twain's works before moving on to something else.
MUTigermask
Boudin rouge








Since: 8.10.03
From: Columbia MO

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#136 Posted on | Instant Rating: 6.14
    Originally posted by wmatistic
    Just finished A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin. Loved this book, can't wait to read the rest of the series.


Well, once you get to being done with the latest one that's out I sure hope you like to wait forever between books.

Currently reading The Rape of Nanking by Iris Chang. The Holocaust was awful, but the Japanese did some pretty fucked up things as well, without getting nearly as much press.
NickBockwinkelFan
Frankfurter








Since: 10.4.02
From: New York City, NY

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#137 Posted on | Instant Rating: 10.00
Well here's a few that I enjoyed recently:

Shocking True Story: The Rise and Fall of Confidential, "America's Most Scandalous Scandal Magazine"
by Henry E. Scott
This book is a riot. It has excerpts from the magazine and the complete history of how Confidential shattered the mythos Hollywood had built for itself after the WW II.

Footnotes in Gaza
by Joe Sacco
I discovered Joe Sacco years ago through his work with Harvey Pekar. This book is an incredibly intense look at Palestine, especially Rafah and the neighboring town of Khan Younis. Sacco shines the light on a brutal massacre in 1956.

Eating The Dinosaur
by Chuck Klosterman
Another series of Klosterman essays on music, film and sports including stuff on Ted Kaczynski's manifesto, Ralph Sampson, ABBA, football, time travel and comparing David Koresh and Kurt Cobain.

Pops: A Life of Louis Armstrong
by Terry Teachout
This is the best work on Louis yet. A new standard bearer work on Armstrong was essential. The racist screed written by James Lincoln Collier has always been accepted as the best work on Louis. Even though Collier's academic work on the historical aspects of Armstrong's life are high quality, his opinions on Armstrong's genius are racist. The Teachout book gives proper due to the brilliance of Louis Armstrong. I believe that Louis Armstrong and Bach are the two most important figures in the last 500 years of music.

    Originally posted by MUTigermask

    Currently reading The Rape of Nanking by Iris Chang. The Holocaust was awful, but the Japanese did some pretty fucked up things as well, without getting nearly as much press.

That book is devastating to read. The war crimes perpetrated by the Japanese upon the Chinese are shocking. It's one of those books you just have to put down at times and go outside and walk around the block to clear your mind. Pure evil.



(edited by NickBockwinkelFan on 27.2.10 0133)

"Well, you can't involve friendship with business. It has to be one or the other. It's either business or friendship, or hit the bricks!"
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ekedolphin
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Since: 12.1.02
From: Indianapolis, IN; now residing in Suffolk, VA

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#138 Posted on | Instant Rating: 2.34
I've been reading a lot of Star Trek books lately. I've finished most of the I.K.S. Gorkon series (which began with the TNG book Diplomatic Implausibility), but I still need to pick up a short story, I think.

I've also been reading the Deep Space Nine relaunch novels. I've finished the Avatar two-parter, the DS9 parts of the Gateways series, the four-part Mission Gamma series, Rising Son, Unity, The Left Hand of Destiny, and Worlds of Deep Space Nine, Volume 1. I'm now on the second story of Volume 2.

(edited by ekedolphin on 28.2.10 0335)


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Mr. Boffo
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Since: 24.3.02
From: Oshkosh, WI

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#139 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.41
I've been reading The Book: Playing The Percentages In Baseball (The W at Amazon). They look at answering all kinds of baseball questions using mathematics, statistics, and probability. It's a very interesting book, and I'd recommend it to anyone who thinks that traditional baseball strategy need not be set in stone.

The whole chapter on batting order was very interesting. Looking at what is best at each position, here's what the Brewers lineup should be (based on projected stats):
1. Rickie Weeks - pretty good OBP, but not much power.
2. Prince Fielder - the best hitters should be 2nd and 4th in the lineup. The one who walks more should be in the #2 spot, and the one with more extra base hits should be in #4. Fielder and Braun are even in extra base hits, but Fielder walks more.
3. Casey McGehee - the battle between Hart and McGehee for the #3 and #5 spots are pretty close. In the end Hart is slightly better, so he gets the #5 spot.
4. Ryan Braun - see Prince's section for details.
5. Corey Hart - see Casey McGehee.
6. Carlos Gomez - now it gets difficult. Both Escobar and Gomez are base stealers without much power. You want to have a base stealer hitting before a guy without much power who doesn't strike out much, because it's not much use if your base stealer steals second, and then the next guy hits a home run. So ironically, both guys would benefit from the other guy hitting before them. We will put Gomez up first because Escobar is much better at avoiding strikeouts.
7. Alcides Escobar - batting Escobar here will probably hurt his steals, but it was still the best place for him.
8. Pitcher - the book does mention that having the pitcher bat 8th is actually better than him batting 9th. And putting the pitcher before a speedy guy like Escobar seems to makes some sense, as hopefully he is more likely to safely advance on a bunt.
9. Gregg Zaun - Gregg Zaun is a bad hitter. His Slugging is .368. That said, he still hits better than the average pitcher, so we put him here to give Rickie Weeks a slight chance to have someone on base in front of him.

In real life, Prince would probably think that being put at the 2 was a demotion and he'd start sulking. But it's interesting to think about.

(edited by Mr. Boffo on 23.3.10 0127)
Reverend J Shaft
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Since: 25.6.03
From: Home of The Big House

Since last post: 12 days
Last activity: 2 hours
#140 Posted on | Instant Rating: 1.50
I just finished Ben Mezrich's The Accidental Billionaires: The Founding of Facebook A Tale of Sex, Money, Genius and Betrayal and found it pretty interesting. His stuff is always a sort-of "embellished non-fiction" and I like his writing style. He also wrote the book that was the basis for that 21 movie with Kevin Spacey about the group of MIT students that took Vegas. That was actually a much better read.
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