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The W - Random - Liquid Body Armor? Wow!
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ThreepMe
Morcilla








Since: 15.2.02
From: Dallas

Since last post: 3760 days
Last activity: 3419 days
#1 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.19
Well, if this isn't one of the coolest things ever...

http://story.news.yahoo.com/ news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/ 20040429/ap_on_sc/hi_tech_body_armor_1

Scientists Working on Flexible Armor

Thu Apr 29,11:03 AM ET Add Science - AP


By BRIAN WITTE, Associated Press Writer

BALTIMORE - Army scientists are working on a liquid body armor for clothing that stays flexible during normal use but can harden to stop a projectile when hit suddenly.


Researchers hope the liquid could be used in sleeves and pants, areas not protected by ballistic vests because they must stay flexible.


The liquid, hard particles suspended in a fluid, is soaked into layers of Kevlar, which holds it in place. Scientists recently had an archer shoot arrows at it to see how well the liquid boosted the strength of a Kevlar vest.


"Instead of the arrow going through the Kevlar, it is completely stopped by the Kevlar vest and sometimes just bounces right off," said Norman Wagner, a University of Delaware chemical engineering professor who is working on the project.


Vests treated with the liquid have also blocked stabs from an ice pick, and researchers are doing more tests to see if it can stop bullets or shrapnel, too.


The project, which has been under way for about three years, is a joint venture between the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the University of Delaware's Center for Composite Materials.


Eric Wetzel, a mechanical engineer who heads the project team for the Army lab, said a "shear thickening fluid" is a key component of the liquid armor. Hard particles are suspended in the liquid, polyethylene glycol. At low strain rates, the particles flow with the fluid, enabling clothing to stay flexible. But when heavily strained, the particles become rigid.


"If it's impacted suddenly by a projectile or a knife, say, it rigidifies and somehow restricts the ability of the fabric to move," Wetzel said.


The transition happens very quickly, a millisecond or quicker.


Wetzel and Wagner are optimistic the liquid body armor will be useful to local police and prison guards and perhaps it could one day protect people in automobile and airplane crashes.








"Are you kidding me? A soda with MY name on it? Now more than ever, SODAS RULE!" - Edge to Christian Smackdown Sept 7th 2000
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estragand
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Since: 18.6.02

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#2 Posted on | Instant Rating: 6.00
Heh! Sounds kinda like Reed Richards' "unstable molecules".



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The Thrill
Banger








Since: 16.4.02
From: Green Bay, WI

Since last post: 248 days
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#3 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.25

Dear God, please let this work. The sooner we can deploy it with our military, the better. Man, I'm pulling for the science geeks on this one.



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samoflange
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Since: 22.2.04
From: Cambridge, MA

Since last post: 430 days
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#4 Posted on | Instant Rating: 2.41
That... is... absolutely amazing. We are now officially one stop closer to "the future."

I just hope the technology behind it is kept very confidential, and there is no hope of any crazy sons of bitches getting there hands on it. Can you imagine some lunatic going on a rampage and the police not being able to bring him down due to full body armor. Gotta be careful with this stuff.



Lloyd: When I met Mary, I got that old fashioned romantic feeling, where I'd do anything to bone her.
Harry: That's a special feeling.
ThreepMe
Morcilla








Since: 15.2.02
From: Dallas

Since last post: 3760 days
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#5 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.19
    Originally posted by samoflange
    That... is... absolutely amazing. We are now officially one stop closer to "the future."

    I just hope the technology behind it is kept very confidential, and there is no hope of any crazy sons of bitches getting there hands on it. Can you imagine some lunatic going on a rampage and the police not being able to bring him down due to full body armor. Gotta be careful with this stuff.


Then the police will have to use techniques that incapacitate, not kill or maim.

Maybe a round that knocks people know as opposed to going through or into them. Maybe something that will open up upon contact with body armor and has enough velocity to knock down a 400 lbs man.

Maybe that foam from Demolition Man that solidified. Just spray (or even in grenade form) and allow to dry. Then you can hang them on your wall like they were Han Solo.

Nets still work pretty good.

Then again, Japan just came out with a running robot. Maybe we can use drones.



"Are you kidding me? A soda with MY name on it? Now more than ever, SODAS RULE!" - Edge to Christian Smackdown Sept 7th 2000
Lexus
Bierwurst








Since: 2.1.02
From: Stafford, VA

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#6 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.76
While the projectiles may not peirce the armor, the force they carry does get exerted upon the body. Thus, an average sized man clad in armor could still be taken down with conventional firearms (a bullet to the knees with that stuff on would be more potent than a baseball bat, I would imagine). Any ballistics experts out there to refute what I'm saying?

Furthermore, it says hit suddenly, which leads me to think that this stuff is reactionary to sudden trauma, even resisting stabs from an icepick. However, what would happen if I were to take a blade and not stab, but slice at the material lined with it? I know the conceivability to this happening in combat is nill, but I'm just curious.

(edited by Lexus on 30.4.04 1211)




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samoflange
Lap cheong








Since: 22.2.04
From: Cambridge, MA

Since last post: 430 days
Last activity: 423 days
#7 Posted on | Instant Rating: 2.45
    Originally posted by Lexus
    Furthermore, it says hit suddenly, which leads me to think that this stuff is reactionary to sudden trauma, even resisting stabs from an icepick. However, what would happen if I were to take a blade and not stab, but slice at the material lined with it? I know the conceivability to this happening in combat is nill, but I'm just curious.

    (edited by Lexus on 30.4.04 1211)


I would think that the material could be sliced through. The materal hardens when subjected to considerable shear stress. Shear stress is a product of shear rate and viscosity. A slow slice would cause a low shear rate, thus low shear stress, and the material would not harden up.
Could be wrong though, I'm a year removed from fluid dynamics class.



Lloyd: When I met Mary, I got that old fashioned romantic feeling, where I'd do anything to bone her.
Harry: That's a special feeling.
anibanging
Italian








Since: 5.3.02

Since last post: 2076 days
Last activity: 122 days
#8 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.15
    Originally posted by samoflange
      Originally posted by Lexus
      Furthermore, it says hit suddenly, which leads me to think that this stuff is reactionary to sudden trauma, even resisting stabs from an icepick. However, what would happen if I were to take a blade and not stab, but slice at the material lined with it? I know the conceivability to this happening in combat is nill, but I'm just curious.

      (edited by Lexus on 30.4.04 1211)


    I would think that the material could be sliced through. The materal hardens when subjected to considerable shear stress. Shear stress is a product of shear rate and viscosity. A slow slice would cause a low shear rate, thus low shear stress, and the material would not harden up.
    Could be wrong though, I'm a year removed from fluid dynamics class.


Probably all true, but if I remember my kevlar facts properly, you ain't gonna be slicing through that with a knife anytime soon.
samoflange
Lap cheong








Since: 22.2.04
From: Cambridge, MA

Since last post: 430 days
Last activity: 423 days
#9 Posted on | Instant Rating: 2.45
    Originally posted by anibanging
    Probably all true, but if I remember my kevlar facts properly, you ain't gonna be slicing through that with a knife anytime soon.


I knew I was missing something. Touché.



Lloyd: When I met Mary, I got that old fashioned romantic feeling, where I'd do anything to bone her.
Harry: That's a special feeling.
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There you go, making me think there was an early Extreme Warfare update!!
- Super Shane Spear, New EW: Chock Full o Good Stuff (2002)
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