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The W - Print - Kids Reading Materials...
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Von Maestro
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Since: 6.1.04
From: New York

Since last post: 132 days
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#1 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.00
A question for the Ws who either have kids or read a lot of kids books...

For a while now I've taken up the mission of trying to get my nieces to read. To start them off I got them hooked on the Harry Potter books, & the two oldest ones really got into them & finished them all by the ages of 7 & 8.

The problem I've run into though is they are resistant to other books, & I'm having a hard time finding stuff for them to read.

Do any of you guys have any suggestions for another series or stand-alone book for kids 10 & under who can handle some pretty decent length books...?

Thanx,
~VM
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tarnish
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Since: 13.2.02
From: Back in the Heart of Hali

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#2 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.03

You might try Terry Pratchett's Discworld kids books. There's "Maurice and His Educated Rodents" and the two books about young witch Tiffany Aching, "Wee Free Men" and "Hat Full of Sky". They are challenging, but not too much so. If you're hoping to get the kids thinking as well as reading, I don't think you could do much better.

The Discworld series is 30 or so books now and is generally a satirical look at our world through the gloss of another world that's different, but not in really important ways.

I'll also mention Philip Pullman's "His Dark Materials" trilogy. The only caveat I have is that the third book would be quite a challenge for any child/early teen who doesn't read a lot. There's also a ton of religious dogma that might either go right over a kid's head or lead him or her to start asking some really difficult questions.




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Since: 25.2.04
From: Keystone State

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#3 Posted on | Instant Rating: 6.38
My sister teaches 5th grade, and my old roommate teaches 4th grade, so I know a little bit about this stuff. Plus, even though I'm a secondary ed major, I've been in a few elementary classrooms lately.

I think the problem is that the Harry Potter books were so universal for a ton of kids that when a 7 year old reads them, they then have to go back to books their "own age", which are usually thinner and less substantive. I'd say the following books are for 9-12 year olds (as stated by Amazon and agreed by me).

When I was a kid, I loved the author Avi. He's written a ton of books now, and The True Confessions of Charlott Doyle is a favorite of a lot of kids I know. It's about a 13 year old girl on a pirate ship going across the sea. I think if they can handle Harry Potter than can handle this. My favorite Avi books were The Man Who Was Poe and Something Upstairs. Both of those books are a bit scary, so if they scare easily, it might not be wise. He's got a whole series of books that take place in the Dimwood Forest. I read Poppy the other day, and all of those books seem appropriate. Of course, if you are comparing them to Harry Potter, it's much shorter, has bigger words, and has drawings, but it's a nice story.

Also, when I was a kid I was absolutely nuts for the author John Bellairs. His business was basically kid horror/suspense, but there was nothing too intense. His books took place in the 1950s, and concentrated on one of two little boys and the strange goings on in their lives. Any of his books would keep me glued to the pages for hours. And, even though he's dead, apparently somebody else has written a whole bunch of sequels with the same characters that I might actually have to pick up.

I was never into them, but I've seen a lot of Harry Potter-heads go to the Chronicles of Narnia in between releases of Harry.

My sisters' fifth graders really like two recent books by Kate DiCamillo: Because of Winn-Dixie and The Tale of Despereaux. They're award winning books, and great for 3rd grade and up. I was at my niece's book fair/Thanksgiving pageant a few weeks ago, and my sis raved about those books to me as we waited for the play to start. She teaches Winn Dixie in class.

(edited by Roy. on 3.12.04 1120)
Alex
Bratwurst








Since: 24.2.02

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#4 Posted on | Instant Rating: 6.00
Give the Artemis Fowl series a try. Eoin Colfer blends realistic and fantasy worlds together quite nicely.

Also, Madeleine L'Engle is one heck of an author. She wrote A Wrinkle in Time, among others.

Late edit: The Never-Ending Story, by Michael Ende is really really good.

(edited by Mack Salmon on 5.12.04 1543)



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Nuclear Winter
Boudin rouge








Since: 9.11.03
From: Bedford, Michigan

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#5 Posted on | Instant Rating: 1.28
May be a little advanced for them (I obviously don't know their reading levels) but you might look at the Redwall series by Brian Jacques. Especially if they're into animals.



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Liverwurst








Since: 28.6.04
From: Troy, NY

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#6 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.13
I recommend The Trouble with Lemons by Daniel Hayes. Liked it as a kid, and gotta give some love to a local author. Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli was also a favorite of mine at that age.



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Whitebacon
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Since: 12.1.02
From: Fresno, CA

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#7 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.04
I used to devour Beverly Cleary's books when I was around that age, as well as Judy Blume's "Fudge" series.



dunkndollaz
Banger








Since: 3.1.02
From: Northern NJ

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#8 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.36
I have started reading "Peter and the Star Catchers" by Dave Barry & Ridley Pearson to my 6 year old - it's the Peter Pan Pre-quel (the authors have recently signed to write another)- and I am having trouble not sneaking in a chapter or two myself after she goes to sleep.



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Karlos the Jackal
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Since: 2.1.02
From: The City of Subdued Excitement

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#9 Posted on | Instant Rating: 8.00
The series that I read back then that I still re-read today (and that might appeal to Harry Potter fans) are The Chronicles of Narnia (but read 'em in the original published order -- no chronological-storyline-order bullshit); the Prydain Chronicles by Lloyd Alexander (The Black Cauldron movie was based, crappily, on one of the books); and the Moomintroll books ("Comet in Moominland" is, I think, the first one, but "Finn Family Moomintroll" might be a better starting place).

Oh, and I second's Roy's Bellairs recommendation -- especially "The House With a Clock in its Walls." His books also often have great Edward Gorey illustrations.

--K

P.S. And Daniel Pinkwater.





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Whitebacon
Boudin blanc








Since: 12.1.02
From: Fresno, CA

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#10 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.04
That reminds me of a question I've been meaning to ask. What is the right order? The set I have starts out with "The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe". I think that's right, no?



BWT
Boerewors








Since: 27.1.04
From: Philly

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#11 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.76
I would recommend the Wayside School books as I pulled them out on Thanksgiving for my younger cousins and they had a blast as with them and I know I did too years ago.
Lise
Mrs. Guru








Since: 11.12.01

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#12 Posted on | Instant Rating: 10.00
I would have to second the Artemis Fowl books if they liked Harry Potter. If you have to pick just a couple I would certainly pick up these.

Susan Cooper's The Dark Is Rising series is probably also a good bet.

The Princess Bride by William Goldman

At 8-10 I was probably still a big fan of the Little House on the Prairie books and other things of that sort

The Borrowers books by Mary Norton

Oh, and the Chronicles of Prydain (Black Cauldron etc) by Lloyd Alexander

Our downstairs neighbor (age 11) is rather fond of anything with Hillary Duff on the cover and things of that sort, but I keep trying to fix that.



...oh bother.
Mr. Boffo
Scrapple








Since: 24.3.02
From: Oshkosh, WI

Since last post: 359 days
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#13 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.29
    Originally posted by Whitebacon
    That reminds me of a question I've been meaning to ask. What is the right order? The set I have starts out with "The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe". I think that's right, no?

Yeah.
1. The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe
2. Prince Caspian
3. The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
4. The Silver Chair
5. The Horse and His Boy
6. The Magician's Nephew
7. The Last Battle

Chronological storyline order comes about because The Magician's Nephew actually amounts to being a prequel of the other books, IIRC. The rest seem to go mostly in order.



NOTE: The above post makes no sense. We apologize for the inconvenience.
Gavintzu
Summer sausage








Since: 2.1.02
From: Calgary ... Alberta Canada

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#14 Posted on | Instant Rating: 0.00
My absolute favorite set of books when I was a preteen was the Swallows and Amazons series of books by Arthur Ransome. I think they are still very popular in Britain, I'm not so sure on this side of the Atlantic.

Click Here (amazon.com) for the Amazon (ha!) site.

Click Here (arthur-ransome.org) for an Arthur Ransome Society site ... jeez if the guy has a society named after him the books are bound to be good right?



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Jericholic53
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Since: 18.3.03
From: Honolulu, HI

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#15 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.42
The "A Wrinkle in Time" series is pretty good, although the concepts of mitochondria might be a little much(?). Other than that Roald Dahl books have never steered me wrong while reading them or reading to others.

(edited by Jericholic53 on 4.12.04 0227)


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rinberg
Boudin rouge








Since: 30.1.02
From: South Georgia

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#16 Posted on
Another choice they might enjoy is the series that the new Jim Carrey movie is based on: A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket (pseudonym).



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Whitebacon
Boudin blanc








Since: 12.1.02
From: Fresno, CA

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#17 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.04
    Originally posted by Jericholic53
    The "A Wrinkle in Time" series is pretty good, although the concepts of mitochondria might be a little much(?). Other than that Roald Dahl books have never steered me wrong while reading them or reading to others.

    (edited by Jericholic53 on 4.12.04 0227)


I second both of these choices. I remember reading these at some point during elementary school, and loved them.



Wolfram J. Paulovich
Frankfurter








Since: 11.11.02
From: Fat City, Baby

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#18 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.27
    Originally posted by Karlos the Jackal
    Oh, and I second's Roy's Bellairs recommendation -- especially "The House With a Clock in its Walls." His books also often have great Edward Gorey illustrations.


Holy crap! Not one, but two people who read the Bellairs books growing up! I'll see the seconding, and I'll, uh, third the recommendation. This was the series of books that got me out of reading just Bloom County and Far Side collections and actually reading, you know, books. Excellent kid stuff.

I'd begun to think I had hallucinated all of those books, because I wanted to get one for my half-brother, who's nine, but I didn't see them in any of the bookstores I visited last weekend. I'm glad to know that I'll have a productive visit when I go to Amazon.com.



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AWArulz
Knackwurst








Since: 28.1.02
From: Louisville, KY

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#19 Posted on | Instant Rating: 6.14
My poor children have always been required to read, but haven't always takem my recomendations.

Yes, they have read The Potter books and Artimis Fowl. The son has been through most of Twain's stuff as well as the Left Behind series (he read those this summer). He's also reading the Bible through right now.

My daughter's into Hemmingway, but when she was a bit younger, she read the Dragonriders of Pern series (starting with the books about the Harpers - Dragondrums) She also likes other stuff that looks light to me - primarily magazines.

My only requirement for them was Shakespeare. I don't think you can go wrong reading it with your kids, and explaining the language a little.



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Oliver
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Since: 20.6.02
From: #YEG

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#20 Posted on | Instant Rating: 2.88
    Originally posted by Whitebacon
    I used to devour Beverly Cleary's books when I was around that age, as well as Judy Blume's "Fudge" series.
Paula Danziger's books were tremendous. I recommend them to anyone. With that, I'd also say YES to Gordon Korman's "Bruno & Boots" series.



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