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The W - Random - I hate snow, so lets make Chili!
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bash91
Merguez








Since: 2.1.02
From: Plain Dealing, LA

Since last post: 832 days
Last activity: 7 hours
#1 Posted on
I hate snow. At about 9:15 AM Eastern Standard Time on October 17, I was snowed on when I went outside to restrain my flag and flagpole. Of course, snow means that I can start making the big batches of chili that are necessary for my survival on those long and cold Sundays when all that's on the television is NFL Sunday Ticket and the wife and I are fighting over which game we're going to watch. Now, I have several of my own recipes for chili, but given the culinary talent that I've seen here on Wienerville, I thought I'd ask for some of your recipes in order to enhance the chili experience and to give me another excuse to make more chili.

Here's one of my current favorite receipes as a starter.

Ingredients
2 quarts cold-packed venison (can substitute ground venison but it produces a different texture)
1 pound chorizo
10-15 cloves garlic minced
1 large white onion finely diced
1 large red onion finely diced
1 can chipotle peppers in adobo sauce finely chopped
5-? fresh jalapeno peppers finely diced
3-? fresh cayenne peppers finely diced
3-? fresh serrano peppers finely diced
2 15oz cans Garbanzo beans drained or 2 pounds dry Garbanzos rehydrated (the wife doesn't like kidney beans)
2 4oz cans tomato paste
1 quart beef stock
2tbsp red wine vinegar
1/2 cup whiskey (I use Crown Royal but I buy it in bulk for my father-in-law. Any decent whiskey will work.)
1 quart (or more) water
Salt
Pepper
2 tbsp Hungarian Paprika
Dash Cinnamon
Cayenne Powder
1 pound Pepperjack cheese grated or shredded
corn or wheat tortilla chips (if desired)

Season the chorizo with Salt, Pepper, and Cayenne. Brown it in a 12 inch skillet with the onions, garlic, and fresh peppers. Don't add the chipotle because you'll lose most of the adobo sauce when you drain the chorizo. While browning the chorizo, place the cold-pack venison with liquid, the beans, the chipotles with sauce, tomato paste, beef stock, vinegar, and whiskey into a large stewpot and stir to combine while over medium heat. When the chorizo is thoroughly browned, drain it and add it to the stewpot. At this point, add water to taste and texture preference. I usually add about 1-11/2 quarts. Cover and bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer and cook partially covered 4 hours or until the chili reaches your preferred texture. Serve hot with the pepperjack cheese, a small dash of cinnamon, and chips or allow it to cool and store tightly covered for up to one week. This chili also freezes well and can be stored for up to three months in the freezer.

Tim



"Verhoeven's _Starship Troopers_: Based on the back cover of the book by Robert Heinlein."
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Ubermonkeys
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Since: 2.1.02
From: Michigan

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#2 Posted on
81 miles away, snow hasn't made it to Lansing yet. (Undecided as to whether this is good or bad... probably the latter.)

No offense Tim, but your recipe reeks of effort. For the fellow lazy slobs on the board, here's my recipe:

Large can / plastic jug of tomato juice, a can of tomatoes, can of kidney beans, 1-2 packs of Louis Rich pre-cooked chicken strips, 1 medium-to-large sized jar of Ortega taco sauce, a smallish jar of jalepenos.

Burn the fuck out of the chicken. Throw everything else in a pot. When the chicken's done, throw it in with the rest of the junk. Cook it for about 5 or 6 years or until it's thick enough to double for pre-school paste.



Don't injure yourself, Porcelain Cowboy!

Parts Unknown
Lap cheong








Since: 2.1.02
From: Darkenwood

Since last post: 1 day
Last activity: 1 day
#3 Posted on
I like starting with a good salsa base. Puree some white onion, green onion, tomatoes, jalapenos, cilantro and salt and pepper.
Brown da meat.
Add the salsa. Add lots of crushed red pepper flakes and chili powder.
Add a whoooooole bunch of tomato sauce (per Ubermonkeys' suggestion).

COOK TILL DEAD

EDIT: Making chili with venison just seems like a horrid waste of the most wonderful meat in the universe. It adds nothing to the taste. Just use GROUND CHUCK, my brothers, then have deer steak later.

(edited by Parts Unknown on 17.10.02 1320)

"Oh, i'll never understand this emptiness...but I'll never really try and understand, I guess." - Whiskeytown, Sit and Listen to the Rain
emma
Cherries > Peaches








Since: 1.8.02
From: Phoenix-ish

Since last post: 8 days
Last activity: 1 day
#4 Posted on

    Originally posted by bash91
    I hate snow. At about 9:15 AM Eastern Standard Time on October 17, I was snowed on when I went outside to restrain my flag and flagpole. Of course, snow means that I can start making the big batches of chili that are necessary for my survival on those long and cold Sundays when all that's on the television is NFL Sunday Ticket and the wife and I are fighting over which game we're going to watch. Now, I have several of my own recipes for chili, but given the culinary talent that I've seen here on Wienerville, I thought I'd ask for some of your recipes in order to enhance the chili experience and to give me another excuse to make more chili.
Tee-hee-hee. At 11:18 AM MST on October 17, its a balmy 81 outside here, & the evap cooling is keeping it at a lovely 73 inside. (It is definitely autumn though -- its been plummeting down into the 60's overnight.) I know some people think of the southwest as chili country, but here in the desert, its often December before it cools off enough to even think about doing stuff that requires hours of stovetop. (We tend more to specialize in things that don't heat up the kitchen!)

Your recipe sounds really, really good. I'm just going to have to wait a few more months before I give it a try.

Oh, & get a second TV -- then you & your wife can co-exist in harmony while snowbound ...
bash91
Merguez








Since: 2.1.02
From: Plain Dealing, LA

Since last post: 832 days
Last activity: 7 hours
#5 Posted on

    Originally posted by Ubermonkeys
    81 miles away, snow hasn't made it to Lansing yet. (Undecided as to whether this is good or bad... probably the latter.)


I doubt you'll see any of the snow. It pretty quickly changed into sleet and then into the miserable cold sprinkling rain that we're currently getting.


    Originally posted by Parts Unknown
    Making chili with venison just seems like a horrid waste of the most wonderful meat in the universe. It adds nothing to the taste. Just use GROUND CHUCK, my brothers, then have deer steak later.


I agree, to an extent. I most assuredly wouldn't use anything even remotely resembling fresh venison in chili. No, that's reserved for ye old cast iron skillet with some butter, onions, salt, pepper, garlic, and fresh basil. However, cold-packed venison does add both a nice texture and a wonderful flavor to this chili. (It also makes a killer pasta sauce but, to paraphrase AB, that's another thread.) I'm a little more hesitant about using ground venison because I don't think it adds as much flavor but it's an okay substitute if you don't have cold-pack.


    Originally posted by Emma
    Tee-hee-hee. At 11:18 AM MST on October 17, its a balmy 81 outside here, & the evap cooling is keeping it at a lovely 73 inside. (It is definitely autumn though -- its been plummeting down into the 60's overnight.)


As Bill the Cat once said, "Ptttthhhhhbbbbbb." My last look at the thermometer suggests that it has reached a balmy 39 outside and the furnace is keeping it at a slightly cool 72 inside.

Tim




"Verhoeven's _Starship Troopers_: Based on the back cover of the book by Robert Heinlein."
dunkndollaz
Banger
Back to Back Survivor








Since: 3.1.02
From: Northern NJ

Since last post: 6 days
Last activity: 22 hours
#6 Posted on
Here is my recipe for a basic Turkey Chili - feel free to play with the recipe any way you want - I like to top it off with either Monterey Jack or Cheddar and a couple of dashes of tabasco

and send some of that snow my way....

Ingredients
2 pounds ground turkey
1 (46 fluid ounce) can tomato juice
1 (29 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/2 cups chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped celery
1/4 cup chopped green bell pepper
1/4 cup chili powder
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 1/2 teaspoons garlic powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon white sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
2 cans red beans, drained and rinsed

Directions
1 Place ground turkey in a large, deep skillet. Cook over medium-high heat. Drain, crumble, and set aside.
2 Add all ingredients to a large kettle. Bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 1 to 1 1/2 hours, stirring occasionally.




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Jaguar
Knackwurst








Since: 23.1.02
From: Phoenix, AZ

Since last post: 232 days
Last activity: 33 days
#7 Posted on
Grrrrrrrrrr. Now I want some chili. Of course, I can't eat the damn chili cause I have a cold and my throat is killing me with every mouthful of water. And of course, I have to wait until I'm not so loopy on cold drugs and PAIN~! to go out and buy some Chicken Noodle Soup

Ohhhh, woe is me. Woe is me.

-Jag

Woe is I as well, you nitpickers.



With poison running through your veins, and death marching solemnly towards you, heroic acts become more of a necessity as you see your time dwindling.

Vanquishing your enemies, making amends to those you have wronged, and leaving words of love and kindness for those around you become second nature as your own mortality looms

However, true strength lies not in these last desperate acts, but in the actions of one who has to get out of bed the next day and face the consequences of doing that which you believe is right.
Brian P. Dermody
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Since: 20.9.02
From: New York, NY

Since last post: 971 days
Last activity: 393 days
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#8 Posted on
I don't use water in chili... ever.

Cheap beer works great, and the alcohol helps the meat take on the flavor. I've been using MGD lately
Of course, it's all a matter of taste, and I like mine to have the consistency of roofing tar.
Other that the liquid, Bash's recipe looks pretty good. I've also heard adding a splash of cocoa powder for color. And any good chili is going to be topped with fresh cilantro.
And a word to the wise, you can't have too much cumin in your chili. It simply can't happen.



Modern Humorist
vsp
Andouille








Since: 3.1.02
From: Philly

Since last post: 3067 days
Last activity: 281 days
#9 Posted on
Bash's recipe definitely gets one thing right -- real chili does NOT use commercial chili powder, which is largely salt. Real peppers are more than flavorful enough to add the required kick, are better for you, and can be neutered (by removing the seeds and pith) if those around you can't stand the heat.

The following is one of my favorites, snipped from the talk.bizarre cookbook of yore, and created by a fellow Philadelphian:

Chiladelphia
by Mark-Jason Dominus


INGREDIENTS

* 1 large yellow onion
* 1 tablespoon grease (1)
* 2 anaheim peppers (2)
* 8 serrano peppers
* 3 jalapeno peppers
* 2 large cloves garlic (3)
* 4 scallions
* 2­-3 pounds ground beef (4)
* 2 pounds whole tomatoes, peeled (5)
* 3 pounds dark red kidney beans (6)
* 1 cup fresh cilantro (7)
* 2 bay leaves
* 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
* 1 teaspoon ground cumin
* 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
* 1/2 teaspoon salt

Preface all times and quantities in this recipe with `about'. For example, ``2 pounds tomatoes'' actually means ``about pounds tomatoes'', and ``an hour'' actually means ``about an hour.'' This is chili, not rocket science.

Chili tastes better each day you leave it in the refrigerator. The flavors mature. Chili does not mind re­heating. It also freezes well.

Chili is a BEAN STEW FLAVORED WITH HOT PEPPERS. This recipe is for ``chili con carne,'' which is chili with meat. Although I haven't done it yet, I fully expect that it will be just fine if you omit the meat. I did try substituing tempeh chunks for the ground beef, but it was no good. If you devlop a good tempeh chili recipe based on ``Chiladelphia,'' please send it to me.

People advised me to name my chili "Philly Chili." These people can drop dead. I hate the name "Philly" at least as much as San Franciscans hate the name "Frisco." I live in "Philadelphia," and so the recipe is for "Chiladelphia."

(1) For frying the onions in. In the past, I have used peanut oil, Wesson vegetable oil, and homemade lard. It doesn't matter. If you use a nonstick skillet, you can probably omit the grease entirely.

(2) Anaheim peppers are about six inches long, pale green, lumpy, and mild. Serranos are no more than an inch long, narrow, pointy, smooth, and dark green, and very hot. Jalapenos are like serranos but bigger, fuller and not as hot. The chili will be fine if you use peppers other than those I mention. Use what you have.

Most of the hotness of hot peppers resides in the placenta, which is the white membrane that the seeds are attached to. Most of the rest of the hotness resides in the seeds themselves. I like to remove the seeds and placenta from my peppers, because I like the peppers to contribute more flavor than heat. Your taste may be different.

(3) To chop garlic, sprinkle it with salt before and during the chopping, until it turns into paste. Running the garlic through a press will also work. The only garlic press worth owning is the Susi, made by Xyluss company.

I wouldn't want to use jarred chopped garlic; it always tastes of that weird vinegar they pack it in.

(4) I've been using ground round steak. This is expensive. I suspect that it doesn't matter whether you use cheapie ground beef or expensive ground beef. I was going to use cheapie ground beef last time I made it but couldn't find any in the grocery store.

(5)Canned tomatoes are fine, but fresh are better. To peel fresh raw tomatoes, plunge them into boiling water for ten seconds.

(6) It's important to get dark red kidney beans, because they give the chili a better color. Canned beans are fine. If you use dried beans, don't forget to soak them overnight and throw away the floaters in the morning.

(7) Cilantro is the leaf of the coriander plant. If you can't get fresh cilantro, add 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander seed instead. About one person in 10 thinks that cilantro tastes exactly like soap. Omit the cilantro when cooking for these people. (I think it tastes exactly like soap too, but whenever I eat cilantro, I'm always shocked at how delicious soap can be.)

INSTRUCTIONS

* Peel and chop garlic. Chop onions, peppers and scallions.
* Sautee the onions in the grease in a heavy cast­-iron skillet until they are translucent.
* Add beef, scallions, peppers, and garlic.
* Sautee until the beef is browned.
* Cut the tomatoes into bite-­sized pieces.
* Put the sauteed beef­-pepper-onion-scallion-garlic mix into a large stew pot with the beans and tomatoes.
* Chop the cilantro.
* Add the salt, herbs, and spices to stew pot.
* Simmer at low low heat, stirring occasionally (8), for an hour.
* Correct the seasoning. (9)
* Simmer another 15­-30 minutes. Serve hot over rice.
Feeds 8­ - 12 people.

(8) The objective here is to keep it from burning on the bottom. If it *does* burn on the bottom, just leave it alone. Don't scrape at it, because then you'll have burnt crap mixed in with your chili.

(9) I almost always add more salt and pepper at this point, sometimes more cumin. Remember the Cardinal Rule of Cooking, the one that even comes ahead of "Hot glass looks the same as cold glass:" TASTE IT, STUPID.

This is basically the "Chili con Carne" recipe from The Joy of Cooking, with amounts scaled up for younger appetites, and with real seasonings substituted for "chili powder." I take full credit for the recipe because the recipe is entirely in the seasonings.
The Joy of Cooking wanted you to put in a teaspoon of sugar. Can you believe that? Half a cup of browned onion and they want you to add sugar. The trouble with the Joy of Cooking is that they're firmly entrenched in the cuisine of the Eisenhower administration and no matter what they're cooking, they think they're making Jello. Everything has to have sugar in it, and everything has to go into a mold. OK, sorry. I'll shut up now.
They also think that black pepper is daring and exotic. They say ``1/2 cup chopped onion or 1/2 clove chopped garlic.'' Like it's too risky to use both. OK, OK. Now I'm really done ragging on The Joy of Cooking.




"No society has managed to invest more time and energy in the perpetuation of the fiction that it is _moral, sane and wholesome_ than our current crop of _Modern Americans_."
-- Frank Zappa
bash91
Merguez








Since: 2.1.02
From: Plain Dealing, LA

Since last post: 832 days
Last activity: 7 hours
#10 Posted on

    Originally posted by DJ Ran
    I don't use water in chili... ever.

    Cheap beer works great, and the alcohol helps the meat take on the flavor. I've been using MGD lately
    Of course, it's all a matter of taste, and I like mine to have the consistency of roofing tar.
    Other that the liquid, Bash's recipe looks pretty good. I've also heard adding a splash of cocoa powder for color. And any good chili is going to be topped with fresh cilantro.
    And a word to the wise, you can't have too much cumin in your chili. It simply can't happen.



I love using beer in my chili, or is that in me? Anyways, I use water, stock, and whiskey in this recipe rather than beer because I think it actually brings out more of the flavor of the venison. Generally, I like a mix of beer and stock as my chili liquid although there are times that something stronger, like whiskey in this case or tequila when I make chili verde, becomes necessary. As for the cumin, this is one of the 2 recipes I routinely make that doesn't use cumin, the other being the aforementioned chili verde.


    Originally posted by vsp
    Bash's recipe definitely gets one thing right -- real chili does NOT use commercial chili powder, which is largely salt. Real peppers are more than flavorful enough to add the required kick, are better for you, and can be neutered (by removing the seeds and pith) if those around you can't stand the heat.


You are so right. As near as I can figure, the only purpose of chili powder is to add color to the chili. Paprika or cumin do the same thing and taste better. Fresh peppers are essential to all of my recipes although I've been known to use canned anaheims when I can't find any fresh ones around here. I'll have to try the Chiladelphia, although I simply refuse to serve any chili over rice unless I'm making a chili risotto.

Tim




"Verhoeven's _Starship Troopers_: Based on the back cover of the book by Robert Heinlein."
dunkndollaz
Banger
Back to Back Survivor








Since: 3.1.02
From: Northern NJ

Since last post: 6 days
Last activity: 22 hours
#11 Posted on
I plead guilty to using Chili Powder. It's a shortcut in my basic recipe. I try not to use it but my two little girls (4 1/2 & 2 1/2) can't handle the spices just yet so I cater to their tastebuds.

Have more damn deer running around in my woods than I need so if anyone wants to come get some fresh venison in order to make Bash's chili, please feel free to come on over



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Brian P. Dermody
Liverwurst
Moderator








Since: 20.9.02
From: New York, NY

Since last post: 971 days
Last activity: 393 days
AIM:  
Y!:
#12 Posted on


-edit-
And if you live near a Portugese neighborhood, as I did growing up, it's worth it to seek out their Chourico or Linguica. They're flavorful pork sausages, with Chourico having a lil more kick. I'm told it's different from chorizo, as well.


My chili recipe changes every time, depending on what I can get out of the garden, but always starts with two cans of Italian style whole peeled tomatoes with basil. I kinda stink at growing tomatoes.
After that though, it's extrapolated from two books: "The Von Hoffman Bros. Big Damn Book of Sheer Manliness" (how can you go wrong with a title so full of hubris?) and "The Screenwriter Within", by D.B. Gilles, an old professor of mine and a chili nut.
Though it's now changing again becuase I'm going to have to try it without powder now.
I tend to use ground turkey and hot Italian turkey sausage in roughly equal parts for the meat.
A bay leaf also gives it some nice flavor.
I've also done it with whiskey, but I always use Beam (for the smoky flavor)
And the von Hoffman's say that with chili, any meat is fine, and recommend rattlesnake. Show-offs.

Though I'd be remiss if I didn't mention

**Lund's Chili Blanco**
a recipe a friend of mine got in Minnesota. I think it comes from a local supermarket chain.

1 lb white beans, rinsed (pretty sure these started as dry beans - canned ones came out overdone and there weren't enough of 'em)
6 cups chicken broth
2 large onions, chopped
1 tbsp oil
6-8 cloves minced garlic
7 oz diced green chiles
2-3 tbsp ground cumin
2 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp cayenne pepper
4 c cooked diced chicken
1 c sour cream
3 c Jack cheese

Combine beans & broth in a pot, simmer for 2 hrs.
Saute onions in oil until golden. Add onions, garlic, chiles, cumin, oregano, cayenne and chicken to beans. Simmer 30 minuetes.
Add sour cream and jack, heat until cheese melts.

Serve with sour cream, green onions, cilantro & tomatoes.

This stuff is freakin great.

Of course, now we have to have your chili verde recipe, Tim. And mad kudos for starting this awesome thread.

(edited by DJ Ran on 18.10.02 2051)


Modern Humorist
Feely
Merguez








Since: 6.10.02
From: Long Island, NY

Since last post: 291 days
Last activity: 3 hours
#13 Posted on
I've heard of it being chili outside while snowing, but INSIDE? That's CRAAAAAZY. HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA. I apologize for that.



-Feely
bash91
Merguez








Since: 2.1.02
From: Plain Dealing, LA

Since last post: 832 days
Last activity: 7 hours
#14 Posted on
Thanks for all the ideas so far. Please, keep them coming. By request, and if you thought the last recipe "reeked of effort" (I love that phrase and really need to find a way to work that into my everyday conversation.), don't look at this recipe as the prep time is probably even greater, especially if you roast your own peppers.

Chili Verde
Ingredients:
3-4lbs boneless pork butt or loin or 4.5-5.5lbs bone-in
1 large white onion diced
10-12 garlic cloves coarse chopped
4-? jalapeno peppers diced
2-? serrano peppers diced
8-12 Anaheim chiles roasted or 2 4oz cans whole green chiles
2-? cups tequila
1.5 quarts beef, pork, or vegetable stock
1tbsp dried or 2 tbsp fresh Oregano
2 tbsp dried or 3 tbsp fresh Basil
Cilantro to taste
Salt and Pepper

I make this chili very dry and often use it as a tortilla or taco filling rather than as a soup or stew. However, this can be made more like a traditional chili by increasing the amount of liquid, either stock or tequila, or by reducing the cooking time slightly. The amount of tequila used is entirely up to your tastes. I find that about 2 cups of Cuervo gold makes for a great flavor but I've used an entire fifth and had that batch turn out delicious. I would recommend using a decent tequila like Jose Cuervo because cheap tequila makes this taste lousy and why waste the good stuff seasoning pork when you can use it to season yourself.
Cut the pork into 1/2-1 inch cubes and season with your favorite seasonings (I use a mix of 2 parts kosher salt, 2 parts Paprika, 2 parts Garlic Powder, 2 parts Cayenne pepper, 1 part Onion powder, 1 part dry mustard, and 1 part wasabi powder. Your mileage may vary.) Save the bone if you are using bone-in and trim excess fat, whatever that might be, from the pork while cubing it. Once the pork is cubed, sweat the onion, garlic, jalapenos, serranos, oregano, basil, cilantro, salt, and pepper in a small amount of oil until the veggies are softened. Put this mixture into a large stewpot with the stock and bone if you have one. Turn the heat up to high and sear the pork in small batches in the same skillet. The better the sear, the more the flavor in the finished product. While the pork is searing, cut the roasted or canned anaheims into thin strips and add to the stewpot. Once all the pork is seared, deglaze the skillet with a small amount of the tequila and add that to the pot. Bring this mix to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer. Partially cover the pot and let it cook for 2-3 hours, stirring occasionally. The chili is done when the pork shreds easily when pressed on with a wooden spoon. I cook mine until it is almost dry and then shred the pork with a potato masher. I recommend serving the dry version of this on tortillas or tacos with fresh cilantro, cheese, and diced onions. I serve the wet version garnished with cilantro and cheese with corn or wheat tortilla ships on the side.

Tim



"Verhoeven's _Starship Troopers_: Based on the back cover of the book by Robert Heinlein."
Brian P. Dermody
Liverwurst
Moderator








Since: 20.9.02
From: New York, NY

Since last post: 971 days
Last activity: 393 days
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#15 Posted on
That looks really good - only one thing. I don't eat pork. It's not a religious thing or anything like that, I just don't like it very much. Any chance you have a recommended substitute meat before I just try it with chicken?



Modern Humorist
bash91
Merguez








Since: 2.1.02
From: Plain Dealing, LA

Since last post: 832 days
Last activity: 7 hours
#16 Posted on
Well, I think pork probably works the best of all the meats I've tried but there are some other options. The best option, goat (yes, I said goat), is often hard to find and quite expensive. As a special event dish, I've also had great luck using fresh, as in carved from the actual deer carcass fresh, venison. Chicken or turkey also works, although they have to be skinless and defatted or they make the end product very greasy and stringy. I've also had good luck with beef and with buffalo. Hope this helps.

Tim



"Verhoeven's _Starship Troopers_: Based on the back cover of the book by Robert Heinlein."
Sec19Row53
Lap cheong








Since: 2.1.02
From: Oconomowoc, WI

Since last post: 12 days
Last activity: 9 hours
Y!:
#17 Posted on
Well, here's the recipe I (think I) followed for the tailgate at Lambeau 4 days ago [NOTE - I go for ease of preparation, which means I use Chili powder]

sautee 1 large diced white onion and 2 diced green peppers in butter until onion starts to be "clear" (substitute other color peppers as you wish - yellow and red work as well)

add 2 lbs. ground beef and 2 lbs. Italian Sausage. Brown and drain

add 3 46 oz. cans Sacramento tomato juice and 4 large cans of Italian (or herbed) crushed tomatoes

add 4 diced/pressed cloves garlic, throw in some chli powder and crushed red pepper (i.e., season to taste - hotter if the kids aren't having any; if you're in Grene Bay, get some Drift Inn Chili seasoning)

simmer for two hours

add 4 cans of chili beans in chili sauce

simmer another hour

Serve with diced raw onion, shredded cheddar, sour cream, and oyster crackers



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