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The W - Movies & TV - 81st Annual Academy Award Nominations
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John Orquiola
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Since: 28.2.02
From: Boston

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#1 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.92
http://www.oscars.org/awards/81academyawards/nominees.html

The Dark Knight was totally snubbed for the main awards except for Best Supporting Actor for Heath Ledger. But while I feel this is an outrage, in a way it pleases me because there's one movie I love more than Dark Knight in 2008, and if it comes down to a populist vote, then Slumdog Millionaire wins for Best Picture. As far as I'm concerned, Slumdog should win everything it's up for.

Performance by an actor in a leading role
Richard Jenkins in “The Visitor” (Overture Films)
Frank Langella in “Frost/Nixon” (Universal)
Sean Penn in “Milk” (Focus Features)
Brad Pitt in “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.)
Mickey Rourke in “The Wrestler” (Fox Searchlight)

Performance by an actor in a supporting role
Josh Brolin in “Milk” (Focus Features)
Robert Downey Jr. in “Tropic Thunder” (DreamWorks, Distributed by DreamWorks/Paramount)
Philip Seymour Hoffman in “Doubt” (Miramax)
Heath Ledger in “The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.)
Michael Shannon in “Revolutionary Road” (DreamWorks, Distributed by Paramount Vantage)

Performance by an actress in a leading role
Anne Hathaway in “Rachel Getting Married” (Sony Pictures Classics)
Angelina Jolie in “Changeling” (Universal)
Melissa Leo in “Frozen River” (Sony Pictures Classics)
Meryl Streep in “Doubt” (Miramax)
Kate Winslet in “The Reader” (The Weinstein Company)

Performance by an actress in a supporting role
Amy Adams in “Doubt” (Miramax)
Penélope Cruz in “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” (The Weinstein Company)
Viola Davis in “Doubt” (Miramax)
Taraji P. Henson in “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.)
Marisa Tomei in “The Wrestler” (Fox Searchlight)

Best animated feature film of the year
“Bolt” (Walt Disney), Chris Williams and Byron Howard
“Kung Fu Panda” (DreamWorks Animation, Distributed by Paramount), John Stevenson and Mark Osborne
“WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Andrew Stanton

Achievement in art direction
“Changeling” (Universal), Art Direction: James J. Murakami, Set Decoration: Gary Fettis
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Art Direction: Donald Graham Burt, Set Decoration: Victor J. Zolfo
“The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Art Direction: Nathan Crowley, Set Decoration: Peter Lando
“The Duchess” (Paramount Vantage, Pathé and BBC Films), Art Direction: Michael Carlin, Set Decoration: Rebecca Alleway
“Revolutionary Road” (DreamWorks, Distributed by Paramount Vantage), Art Direction: Kristi Zea, Set Decoration: Debra Schutt

Achievement in cinematography
“Changeling” (Universal), Tom Stern
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Claudio Miranda
“The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Wally Pfister
“The Reader” (The Weinstein Company), Chris Menges and Roger Deakins
“Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Anthony Dod Mantle

Achievement in costume design
“Australia” (20th Century Fox), Catherine Martin
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Jacqueline West
“The Duchess” (Paramount Vantage, Pathé and BBC Films), Michael O’Connor
“Milk” (Focus Features), Danny Glicker
“Revolutionary Road” (DreamWorks, Distributed by Paramount Vantage), Albert Wolsky

Achievement in directing
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), David Fincher
“Frost/Nixon” (Universal), Ron Howard
“Milk” (Focus Features), Gus Van Sant
“The Reader” (The Weinstein Company), Stephen Daldry
“Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Danny Boyle

Best documentary feature
“The Betrayal (Nerakhoon)” (Cinema Guild), A Pandinlao Films Production, Ellen Kuras and Thavisouk Phrasavath
“Encounters at the End of the World” (THINKFilm and Image Entertainment), A Creative Differences Production, Werner Herzog and Henry Kaiser
“The Garden” A Black Valley Films Production, Scott Hamilton Kennedy
“Man on Wire” (Magnolia Pictures), A Wall to Wall Production, James Marsh and Simon Chinn
“Trouble the Water” (Zeitgeist Films), An Elsewhere Films Production, Tia Lessin and Carl Deal

Best documentary short subject
“The Conscience of Nhem En” A Farallon Films Production, Steven Okazaki
“The Final Inch” A Vermilion Films Production, Irene Taylor Brodsky and Tom Grant
“Smile Pinki” A Principe Production, Megan Mylan
“The Witness - From the Balcony of Room 306” A Rock Paper Scissors Production, Adam Pertofsky and Margaret Hyde

Achievement in film editing
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Kirk Baxter and Angus Wall
“The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Lee Smith
“Frost/Nixon” (Universal), Mike Hill and Dan Hanley
“Milk” (Focus Features), Elliot Graham
“Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Chris Dickens

Best foreign language film of the year
“The Baader Meinhof Complex” A Constantin Film Production, Germany
“The Class” (Sony Pictures Classics), A Haut et Court Production, France
“Departures” (Regent Releasing), A Departures Film Partners Production, Japan
“Revanche” (Janus Films), A Prisma Film/Fernseh Production, Austria
“Waltz with Bashir” (Sony Pictures Classics), A Bridgit Folman Film Gang Production, Israel

Achievement in makeup
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Greg Cannom
“The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), John Caglione, Jr. and Conor O’Sullivan
“Hellboy II: The Golden Army” (Universal), Mike Elizalde and Thom Floutz

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original score)
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Alexandre Desplat
“Defiance” (Paramount Vantage), James Newton Howard
“Milk” (Focus Features), Danny Elfman
“Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), A.R. Rahman
“WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Thomas Newman

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original song)
“Down to Earth” from “WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Music by Peter Gabriel and Thomas Newman, Lyric by Peter Gabriel
“Jai Ho” from “Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Music by A.R. Rahman, Lyric by Gulzar
“O Saya” from “Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Music and Lyric by A.R. Rahman and Maya Arulpragasam

Best motion picture of the year
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), A Kennedy/Marshall Production, Kathleen Kennedy, Frank Marshall and Ceán Chaffin, Producers
“Frost/Nixon” (Universal), A Universal Pictures, Imagine Entertainment and Working Title Production, Brian Grazer, Ron Howard and Eric Fellner, Producers
“Milk” (Focus Features), A Groundswell and Jinks/Cohen Company Production, Dan Jinks and Bruce Cohen, Producers
“The Reader” (The Weinstein Company), A Mirage Enterprises and Neunte Babelsberg Film GmbH Production, Nominees to be determined
“Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), A Celador Films Production, Christian Colson, Producer

Best animated short film
“La Maison en Petits Cubes” A Robot Communications Production, Kunio Kato
“Lavatory - Lovestory” A Melnitsa Animation Studio and CTB Film Company Production, Konstantin Bronzit
“Oktapodi” (Talantis Films), A Gobelins, L’école de l’image Production, Emud Mokhberi and Thierry Marchand
“Presto” (Walt Disney), A Pixar Animation Studios Production, Doug Sweetland
“This Way Up” A Nexus Production, Alan Smith and Adam Foulkes

Best live action short film
“Auf der Strecke (On the Line)” (Hamburg Shortfilmagency), An Academy of Media Arts Cologne Production, Reto Caffi
“Manon on the Asphalt” (La Luna Productions), A La Luna Production, Elizabeth Marre and Olivier Pont
“New Boy” (Network Ireland Television), A Zanzibar Films Production, Steph Green and Tamara Anghie
“The Pig” An M & M Production, Tivi Magnusson and Dorte Høgh
“Spielzeugland (Toyland)” A Mephisto Film Production, Jochen Alexander Freydank

Achievement in sound editing
“The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Richard King
“Iron Man” (Paramount and Marvel Entertainment), Frank Eulner and Christopher Boyes
“Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Tom Sayers
“WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Ben Burtt and Matthew Wood
“Wanted” (Universal), Wylie Stateman

Achievement in sound mixing
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), David Parker, Michael Semanick, Ren Klyce and Mark Weingarten
“The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Lora Hirschberg, Gary Rizzo and Ed Novick
“Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Ian Tapp, Richard Pryke and Resul Pookutty
“WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Tom Myers, Michael Semanick and Ben Burtt
“Wanted” (Universal), Chris Jenkins, Frank A. Montaño and Petr Forejt

Achievement in visual effects
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Eric Barba, Steve Preeg, Burt Dalton and Craig Barron
“The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Nick Davis, Chris Corbould, Tim Webber and Paul Franklin
“Iron Man” (Paramount and Marvel Entertainment), John Nelson, Ben Snow, Dan Sudick and Shane Mahan

Adapted screenplay
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Screenplay by Eric Roth, Screen story by Eric Roth and Robin Swicord
“Doubt” (Miramax), Written by John Patrick Shanley
“Frost/Nixon” (Universal), Screenplay by Peter Morgan
“The Reader” (The Weinstein Company), Screenplay by David Hare
“Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Screenplay by Simon Beaufoy

Original screenplay
“Frozen River” (Sony Pictures Classics), Written by Courtney Hunt
“Happy-Go-Lucky” (Miramax), Written by Mike Leigh
“In Bruges” (Focus Features), Written by Martin McDonagh
“Milk” (Focus Features), Written by Dustin Lance Black
“WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Screenplay by Andrew Stanton, Jim Reardon, Original story by Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter

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Big Bad
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Since: 4.1.02
From: Dorchester, Ontario

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#2 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.62
All I wanted for TDK was a nomination. Slumdog's going to win, and I've got no issue with that since it's a great film as well, but really, would it have killed the Academy to put Dark Knight into the final five? Apparently so. Frost/Nixon is a nice movie, but not Best Picture material. Benjamin Button I'm not even sure is as good as 'nice.'

The one I really don't get is a snub for Bruce Springsteen's song from The Wrestler. I thought that was a lock for the win, let alone a nomination. Why does the 'best song' category go between three and five nominees from year to year while virtually every other category has a set group of five?

Picks....Slumdog, Boyle, Rourke, Winslet, Cruz and Ledger (geez, is Ledger winning even up in the air now?). The bright side is that Winslet looks on pace to finally win her first Oscar.

(edited by Big Bad on 22.1.09 1032)

Skinner: Well, I was wrong. The lizards are a godsend.
Lisa: But isn't that a bit short-sighted? What happens when we're overrun by lizards?
Skinner: No problem. We simply release wave after wave of Chinese needle snakes. They'll wipe out the lizards.
Lisa: But aren't the snakes even worse?
Skinner: Yes, but we're prepared for that. We've lined up a fabulous type of gorilla that thrives on snake meat.
Lisa: But then we're stuck with gorillas!
Skinner: No, that's the beautiful part. When wintertime rolls around, the gorillas simply freeze to death!
Tenken347
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Since: 27.2.03
From: Parts Unknown

Since last post: 4 days
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#3 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.03
I don't know why people thought TDK was going to get more than the nom for Ledger and the technical awards. It's a comic book movie. That's not real movie-making. If Ledger hadn't died, there's no chance he would have gotten nominated for playing the Joker, no matter how great he was.

Of course, Ledger did die, and the Academy still feels bad for not giving him a statue for playing a gay cowboy. He's the closest thing to a lock that the Academy Awards has ever seen. And when he wins, it's going to help legitimize the comic book film whether the Academy means to or not. And the next time anything even close to as good as TDK comes out, they're going to have to take a harder look at it, and maybe it will get the nom. As sorry as I am that it took the death of a talented young man, this award could be very big for critical acceptance of the genre.
The King of Keith
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Since: 4.11.02
From: Winchester, VA

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#4 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.77
I am so glad the overhyped Dark Knight did not get nominated. I am very glad that Marisa Tomei did get nominated. That is all.



Hail to the Redskins!
John Orquiola
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Since: 28.2.02
From: Boston

Since last post: 62 days
Last activity: 62 days
#5 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.92
    Originally posted by Tenken347
    I don't know why people thought TDK was going to get more than the nom for Ledger and the technical awards. It's a comic book movie. That's not real movie-making. If Ledger hadn't died, there's no chance he would have gotten nominated for playing the Joker, no matter how great he was.

    Of course, Ledger did die, and the Academy still feels bad for not giving him a statue for playing a gay cowboy. He's the closest thing to a lock that the Academy Awards has ever seen. And when he wins, it's going to help legitimize the comic book film whether the Academy means to or not. And the next time anything even close to as good as TDK comes out, they're going to have to take a harder look at it, and maybe it will get the nom. As sorry as I am that it took the death of a talented young man, this award could be very big for critical acceptance of the genre.


The Dark Knight was A) The highest-grossing movie of 2008 B) One of the most critically-acclaimed movies of 2008, C) One of the most popular movies with audiences of 2008.

Those three factors together make for a rare breed of movie. Add to that Heath Ledger's performance as The Joker and there was no reason to think it WOULDN'T get nominated. Of course, it didn't, so that point is moot.

So what if it's a "comic book movie"? What the hell was Lord of the Rings: Return of the King, winner of Best Picture (among other Oscars) of 2003? What, elves, wizards and orcs constitutes "real movie-making" and a superhero in a Batsuit doesn't? Which movie was more "realistic"?

And Ledger would have been nominated, living or dead, as The Joker. I say that with absolute conviction. So what if he was playing a comic book supervillain in clown make up? He was GREAT. It's insulting to his performance and talent to say otherwise, that he's getting rewarded for DYING.

(edited by John Orquiola on 22.1.09 1007)
Super Shane Spear
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Since: 2.1.02
From: Sector 7 Slums

Since last post: 1538 days
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#6 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.28
Frost/Nixon was the best boxing film since Million Dollar Baby and I hope it wins everything it touches.



I don't mean to seem like I care about material things (like a social status,)
I just want four walls and adobe slabs for my girls
Tenken347
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Since: 27.2.03
From: Parts Unknown

Since last post: 4 days
Last activity: 5 hours
#7 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.03
    Originally posted by John Orquiola
      Originally posted by Tenken347
      I don't know why people thought TDK was going to get more than the nom for Ledger and the technical awards. It's a comic book movie. That's not real movie-making. If Ledger hadn't died, there's no chance he would have gotten nominated for playing the Joker, no matter how great he was.

      Of course, Ledger did die, and the Academy still feels bad for not giving him a statue for playing a gay cowboy. He's the closest thing to a lock that the Academy Awards has ever seen. And when he wins, it's going to help legitimize the comic book film whether the Academy means to or not. And the next time anything even close to as good as TDK comes out, they're going to have to take a harder look at it, and maybe it will get the nom. As sorry as I am that it took the death of a talented young man, this award could be very big for critical acceptance of the genre.


    The Dark Knight was A) The highest-grossing movie of 2008 B) One of the most critically-acclaimed movies of 2008, C) One of the most popular movies with audiences of 2008.

    Those three factors together make for a rare breed of movie. Add to that Heath Ledger's performance as The Joker and there was no reason to think it WOULDN'T get nominated. Of course, it didn't, so that point is moot.

    So what if it's a "comic book movie"? What the hell was Lord of the Rings: Return of the King, winner of Best Picture (among other Oscars) of 2003? What, elves, wizards and orcs constitutes "real movie-making" and a superhero in a Batsuit doesn't? Which movie was more "realistic"?

    And Ledger would have been nominated, living or dead, as The Joker. I say that with absolute conviction. So what if he was playing a comic book supervillain in clown make up? He was GREAT. It's insulting to his performance and talent to say otherwise, that he's getting rewarded for DYING.

    (edited by John Orquiola on 22.1.09 1007)


Sorry, I might not have been clear that I was implying that it was the Academy's way of thinking to trivialize comic book films regardless of their actual achievements. I thought the film was great and both it and its actors deserve every accolade they rack up.

I think you can probably tell that I don't think much of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. In general, I find them to be a bunch of self-congratulatory bastards who are so far out of touch with movie-goers and critics that they couldn't tell which way the wind was blowing if you explained it to them beforehand. They may have respected Ledger as a performer, but I still don't think that the Joker is a role that they would have considered "Oscar-worthy," regardless of the quality of the performance. I do not believe Ledger would have been nominated for the Joker under any other circumstances.

You make a good point about Lord of the Rings, and the Academy has made some strides in recent years nominating films which have racked up a lot of popular acclaim (i.e., Johnny Depp in Pirates), but they still seem to be having difficulty understanding the new kind of "prestige picture" that TDK represents. Don't get me wrong; I wish they'd nominated it for more things. It's a big movie; well made and highly respected by critics and audiences. But these things don't always matter to a body which likes to congratulate people for doing things the same way they've always been done.
MUTigermask
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Since: 8.10.03
From: Columbia MO

Since last post: 421 days
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#8 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.96
Damn, I was sort of hoping WALL*E would at least get a Best Picture nod. Oh well, its a shoo in for animated feature film with Kung-Fu Panda and Bolt as competition.
spf
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Since: 2.1.02
From: The Las Vegas of Canada

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#9 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.16
TDK was a well-regarded movie. It got very good reviews from critics, and was without a doubt considered to be a quality film. But there were many films that did much better with the critics, the people who do watch every movie, over this year. When looking on Wiki's page that sums up the Top 10 lists for 2008 that TDK appeared on, it appeared in 31 lists.

Problem is what lists are they? The page shows it appeared in 4 top 10 lists that appeared in The Onion A.V. Club. Another 4 of its mentions were top 10 lists that appeared in The Hollywood Reporter. It gets the #1 spot in mass market lists like those in Premiere and Empire. But really among most of the more respected voices critically it landed like it did for Ebert. In the top 20 movies of the year, a definite acheivement, but not something so overwhelmingly quality that it is unfathomable that it didn't get best picture.

And honestly, what did they do different in TDK that hasn't been done in a lot of other big budget movies. They hired good actors, and made a good movie. But there is nothing revolutionary about the movie. It falls in the line with Iron Man, Spider Man 2, and any other well-regarded superhero/comic book movie. The only thing it did different was have its most talked about performer die before release, giving his role extra heft and extra attention.



2007 and 2008 W-League Fantasy Football champion!
dwaters
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Since: 16.10.02
From: Connecticut

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#10 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.45
    Originally posted by John Orquiola



    Robert Downey Jr. in “Tropic Thunder” (DreamWorks,



Oh, the irony.

He gets an Academy nomination for playing the role of an actor who is playing a role in hopes of getting an Academy award.

I think he should win based on the one-two punch of this performance and in "Iron Man". He made a good movie into a great movie singlehandedly. It's too bad his movie had to come out the same year as "The Dark Knight" and get totally overshadowed.
BigDaddyLoco
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Since: 2.1.02

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#11 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.35
I really thought the Dark Knight was great the first time I watched it, but now everytime I rewatch it I find myself just waiting for the Heath Leger scenes. Without that performance you really just have yourself another Batman movie.

No love for Grand Torino, I'm surprised.
odessasteps
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Since: 2.1.02
From: MD, USA

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#12 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.32
    Originally posted by dwaters
      Originally posted by John Orquiola



      Robert Downey Jr. in “Tropic Thunder” (DreamWorks,



    Oh, the irony.

    He gets an Academy nomination for playing the role of an actor who is playing a role in hopes of getting an Academy award.




Then there's Kate Winslet, who lampooned the whole notion of "holocaust movie = oscar" in Extras and now had been nominated for one.



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Since: 16.2.07
From: 3rd Floor, NW window

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#13 Posted on | Instant Rating: 4.58
    Originally posted by BigDaddyLoco
    I really thought the Dark Knight was great the first time I watched it, but now everytime I rewatch it I find myself just waiting for the Heath Leger scenes. Without that performance you really just have yourself another Batman movie.

    No love for Grand Torino, I'm surprised.


No kidding. It was an AFI top ten even.
It's False
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Since: 20.6.02
From: I am the Tag Team Champions!

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#14 Posted on | Instant Rating: 2.32
    Originally posted by djp
      Originally posted by BigDaddyLoco
      I really thought the Dark Knight was great the first time I watched it, but now everytime I rewatch it I find myself just waiting for the Heath Leger scenes. Without that performance you really just have yourself another Batman movie.

      No love for Grand Torino, I'm surprised.


    No kidding. It was an AFI top ten even.


That and the Academy LOVES Clint Eastwood. I was expecting directorial and acting noms for this one.



JayJayDean
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Since: 2.1.02
From: Seattle, WA

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Y!:
#15 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.40
    Originally posted by MUTigermask
    Damn, I was sort of hoping WALL*E would at least get a Best Picture nod. Oh well, its a shoo in for animated feature film with Kung-Fu Panda and Bolt as competition.


An unscientific poll of six year-olds and grown-ups in my house would vote thusly...

1. Kung Fu Panda
2. Bolt/WALL*E (tie)

I don't think WALL*E was superior, it just had a more interesting gimmick.

EDIT: Upon review, I would like to clarify - I thought KFP was TREEEEEEMENDOUS and Bolt was very, very good, so that wasn't intended as an "I hated/didn't like/poop on WALL*E"-sentiment by any means. But "Best Picture"? No. I don't even think it should be considered a lock to win Best Animated Feature Film.

However, if you saw WALL*E and you are not a regular viewer of animated films, I guess I can see how you would rated it quite highly. Like I said, there's a six year-old in my house and we see 'em all - I'd have to rate WALL*E behind The Incredibles, Finding Nemo, and Monsters Inc, just among the Pixar library.

(edited by JayJayDean on 22.1.09 1808)


Holy fuck shit motherfucker shit. Read comics. Fuck shit shit fuck shit I sold out when I did my job. Fuck fuck fuck shit fuck. Sorry had to do it....

*snip*

Revenge of the Sith = one thumb up from me. Fuck shit. I want to tittie fuck your ass.
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supersalvadoran
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Since: 10.1.08
From: westbury, new york

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#16 Posted on | Instant Rating: 3.77
I'll join the chorus in being shocked at the lack of 'Gran Torino' love. I'm also shocked at 'Benjamin Button'. It was a good movie, but 13 nominations? That's sounds like at least 7-8 too many.



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Since: 11.2.03
From: Hackettstown, NJ

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#17 Posted on | Instant Rating: 6.02
    Originally posted by JayJayDean
      Originally posted by MUTigermask

      I don't think WALL*E was superior, it just had a more interesting gimmick.


    Wow. I thought WALL-E was tremendous. I haven't seen most of the top nominees (hopefully I'll manage to get to a few), but WALL-E was the best movie I did see this year--certainly I thought it was a much better film than The Dark Knight. (I liked TDK a lot, don't get me wrong.) I think Pixar has made some of the best movies of recent years--Finding Nemo, The Incredibles, Toy Story, WALL-E--and it's absurd that they don't have a single Best Picture nomination to show for it.

    Nice to see Richard Jenkins get a nomination for The Visitor, a very good film that I'm sure few people saw. Catch it on video if you get the chance.
spf
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Since: 2.1.02
From: The Las Vegas of Canada

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#18 Posted on | Instant Rating: 5.16
I haven't seen Wall-E yet, but of the other Pixar movies, the only one that I would have even considered as being worthy of Best Picture contention was Finding Nemo. The rest of them were excellent movies, but not Best Picture caliber.



2007 and 2008 W-League Fantasy Football champion!
Teapot
Kishke








Since: 1.8.02
From: Louisville KY

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#19 Posted on | Instant Rating: 7.95
    Originally posted by supersalvadoran
    I'll join the chorus in being shocked at the lack of 'Gran Torino' love. I'm also shocked at 'Benjamin Button'. It was a good movie, but 13 nominations? That's sounds like at least 7-8 too many.


While Button was a romance, allowing it to effectively vie for the acting, etc. awards, it was also an effects showcase, which lets it compete effectively for those awards, too.

I think what hurt Gran Torino was the strength of the rest of the cast, which was by and large terrible. When Thao was locked in the basement and yelling to be let out, it was all I could do to keep myself from laughing, the kid's acting was so bad. Most of the Hmong cast were non-actors, and boy, did it show.



lotjx
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Since: 5.9.08

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#20 Posted on | Instant Rating: 2.39
I figured either Wall E or Dark Knight would at least get the nod for the much needed ratings. The main thing people will tune into this best supporting actor and that is pretty much it. The Academy has once again then itself in a corner by nominating movies the casual view has not seen or will never see. Days like this I wish I had my radio show where we spend an hour discussing the list. I could spend two hours on how bad the best picture list is. I was hoping JMS would get a nod for changeling or Singer for Valkyre. But those are comic books guys, so why would they get nominated.
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Remember when a R-rating meant some cursing, some violence and maybe some nudity? This R-rated comedy pushed some serious boundaries, but I guess the boundaries keep getting re-drawn with each passing year. Despite that, this movie was funny as hell......
- Mr Shh, Neighbors (2014)
Related threads: 80th Annual Academy Awards - This Year's Oscar Winners - Oscar Predictions - 80th Oscar nominees out - More...
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