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18.12.07 1333
The 7 - Pro Wrestling - WWE Rookies: Too Green for Greed
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stephane_lajoie
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#1 Posted on 26.3.05 1858.54
Reposted on: 26.3.12 1859.01
With Wrestlemania 21 just around the corner, I just couldnít stop wondering where the WWE will be heading after the granddaddy of them all of 2005. With a huge chunk of his upper card wrestlers on the verge of retirement and with their younger days long gone, the WWE is wrongly reacting to the situation by overflowing both rosters with inexperienced wrestlers.

Without star power, the wrestling business canít shine. The WWE is still trying to patch the holes left by the numerous departures and hiatus of their most popular main-eventers 3 years ago. When Rock, Austin and Foley stepped away from the ring, it was the real 3 minutes warning for the WWE.

But the McMahon family took their fans for granted. They put the popularity of the sport on hold, implanted a monopoly on American wrestling and simply piledrived themselves straight to hell.

The marketing and creative departments in Stamford should start freaking out just about now, because their 3 minutes are just about up.

TOO FAST TOO SOON

By skyrocketing rookies to stardom, they exposed the flaws of the wrestling business. By offering monster pushes to unprepared workers, the WWE put guys on TV who are huge on muscle, but short on talent. Just because you are getting in the ring doesn't mean you are a wrestler or ready for the WWE bright lights.

The new breed of wrestlers doesnít even have the time anymore to acclimate to the WWE style and make a name for themselves. Within months, they have a title belt around their waist and participate in high profile angles. They become champion without recognition; wrestlers with paper personalities.

Or on the other end of the spectrum, they enter the big league with fanfare to only be relegated to dark matches after a couple of TV squash bouts. The fans donít care anymore. They are tired of having characters shoved down their throat. They donít like it and they arenít buying it either.

Seeing the new wrestlers showered with boos and boring chants, the WWE reacts by switching the belts, allegiances and storylines like hot potatoes. Entertaining matches, fierce promos and career building feuds arenít created between 2 Pay-per-views or Raw shows.

How many WWE rookies have been involved in angles that just donít make any sense in 2004?

How many WWE rookies will still be on the WWE roster five years from now and be major players?

You all know the answers.

Becoming a pro wrestling superstar should be a slow progression. Let the characters evolve; let the fans discover the new wrestlers. Give the boys 2 to 3 years to build confidence in the ring and on the microphone before making them champions.

What took years to accomplish a decade ago can be done in months in todayís WWE. That trend canít be beneficial to the wrestling business. Young guys are washed up before you know it and itís also discrediting the accomplishments of yesterdayís superstars.

It takes time for a wrestler to build a loyal fanbase but time isnít a hot WWE commodity right now.

On Monday Night Raw, Jim Ross said that the ring wasnít covered in barbecue sauce, so it couldnít possibly taste good. Well good Olí JR, the arena seats might be covered with spicy one, because people donít bother sitting on them anymore.

(edited by stephane_lajoie on 26.3.05 1958)

(edited by stephane_lajoie on 26.3.05 2108)
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#2 Posted on 26.3.05 1929.18
Reposted on: 26.3.12 1930.39
Wow.

You have a DEGREE in this?

Let's forget the fact that your point is completely elusive, your final paragraph fails to wrap up whatever your point is, and perhaps most importantly "Too Green for Greed" doesn't make any sense either (although it's nice that there's only one letter's difference between the words "green" and "greed," I suppose.) Losing the audience at the TITLE is really hard to beat.

Let me just try to proof this.

    Originally posted by Stephane LaJoie, with help from the proofreader
    WWE Rookies: Too Green for Greed

    With Wrestlemania 21 just around the corner, I just couldn't stop wondering where the WWE will be heading after the granddaddy of them all of 2005. With a huge chunk of his their upper card wrestlers on the verge of retirement and with their younger days long gone, the WWE is wrongly reacting to the situation by overflowing overfilling both rosters with inexperienced wrestlers.

    Without star power, the wrestling business can't shine. The WWE is still trying to patch the wholes holes left by the numerous departures and hiatus of their most popular main-eventers 3 three years ago. When Rock, Steve Austin and Mick Foley stepped stepping away from the ring, it was the real 3 three minutes warning for the WWE.

    But the McMahon family took their fans for granted. They put the popularity of the sport on hold, implanted a monopoly on American wrestling and simply piledrived themselves straight to hell. (I can't even figure out how to fix that last sentence)

    The marketing and creative departments in Stamford should start freaking out just about now, because their 3 three minutes are just about up.

    Too Fast To Too Soon

    By skyrocketing rookies to stardom, they have exposed the flaws of the wrestling business. By offering monster pushes to unprepared workers,
    the WWE has put guys on TV who are huge on muscle, but short on talent. Just because you are getting in the ring, that doesn't mean you are a wrestler... or ready for the WWE bright lights.

    The new breed of wrestlers doesn't even have no longer have the time anymore to acclimate to the "WWE style" and make a name for themselves. Within months, they have a title belt around their waist and participate in high profile angles. They become champions without recognition; wrestlers with paper personalities.

    Or, on the other end of the spectrum, they enter the big league with fanfare... to only to be relegated to dark matches after a couple of TV squash bouts. The fans don't care anymore. They are tired of having characters shoved down their throat. They don't like it, and they aren't buying it either.

    Seeing the new wrestlers showered with boos and boring chants, the WWE reacts by switching the belts, allegiances and storylines like hot potatoes. Entertaining matches, fierce promos and career building feuds aren't created between 2 two Pay-per-views or Raw shows.

    How many WWE rookies have been involved in angles that just don't make any sense in 2004?

    How many WWE rookies will still be on the WWE roster five years from now and be major players?

    All of Yyou all know the answers.

    The process of Bbecoming a pro wrestling superstar should be a slow progression. Let the characters evolve; let the fans discover the new wrestlers. Give the boys 2 two to 3 three years to build confidence in the ring and on the microphone before making them champions.

    What took years to accomplish a decade ago can be done in months in today's WWE. That trend can't be beneficial to the wrestling business.
    Young guys are washed up before you know it, and it's also discrediting the accomplishments of yesterday's superstars.

    It took takes time for a wrestler to build a loyal fanbase, but time isn't a hot WWE commodity right now.

    On Monday Night Raw, Jim Ross said that the ring wasn't covered in barbecue sauce, so it couldn't possibly taste good. Well, "gGood Ol' JR," the arena seats might be covered with a spicy one, because people don't bother sitting on them anymore.


Yikes.

I have to be brutally honest here. I last took classes in journalism, like, 17 years ago, but syntactically I can write circles around you, and that's without me even STARTING on the content issue. If you seriously, SERIOUSLY want to do this professionally, PLEASE curl up with an AP Style Guide until it starts sinking in and the technique of your writing improves. Then we can worry about your content.

Otherwise, please cut the column posting on this forum because it's just too painful to my eyes and I smell a banning.
JohnnyHerbs
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#3 Posted on 26.3.05 1944.05
Reposted on: 26.3.12 1945.15
harsh, dood
stephane_lajoie
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#4 Posted on 26.3.05 1947.46
Reposted on: 26.3.12 1948.02
I'm sorry about the grammatical mistakes in the article. My mother tongue is French and I'm still learning to write in English.

(edited by stephane_lajoie on 26.3.05 2006)
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#5 Posted on 26.3.05 2025.40
Reposted on: 26.3.12 2028.10
    Originally posted by stephane_lajoie
    Within months, they have a title belt around their waist....They become champion without recognition....Give the boys 2 to 3 years to build confidence in the ring and on the microphone before making them champions.
Honestly, I'm not picking on you, nor am I just piling on criticism; I'm asking because I'm genuinely curious: Who are you talking about? Because, unless I'm missing something, the only current or recent title holder on either RAW or Smackdown that I can think of who was a rookie in 2004 is Nick Dinsmore, a.k.a. Eugene.
stephane_lajoie
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#6 Posted on 26.3.05 2050.27
Reposted on: 26.3.12 2055.08

Honestly, I'm not picking on you, nor am I just piling on criticism; I'm asking because I'm genuinely curious: Who are you talking about? Because, unless I'm missing something, the only current or recent title holder on either RAW or Smackdown that I can think of who was a rookie in 2004 is Nick Dinsmore, a.k.a. Eugene.


I wasn't necessarily talking about the champions of 2004.

Wrestlemania 21 made me think of a growing trend over the last few years.

Some wrestlers who got titles to fast in recent years:

Christian (light heavyweight)
La Rťsistance
Randy Orton (Intercontinetal)
Gail Kim
Jazz

and all the tag teams made of two solo wrestlers who weren't establish as a tag team.

It took five years to Triple H to win his first World championship in the WWF. Five years later, he's a 10 times champ. That's insane.


(edited by stephane_lajoie on 26.3.05 2056)
The Vile1
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#7 Posted on 26.3.05 2056.47
Reposted on: 26.3.12 2058.33
What about Carlito? He won the US title in his very first match in the WWE.
stephane_lajoie
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#8 Posted on 26.3.05 2100.18
Reposted on: 26.3.12 2101.00
You're absolutely right about Carlito.

I hate when wrestlers win a belt on their first night in the WWE (Jerry Lynn,Christian).

(edited by stephane_lajoie on 26.3.05 2101)
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#9 Posted on 26.3.05 2140.17
Reposted on: 26.3.12 2140.19
Let's see...

Randy Orton & Carlito are guys that the WWE has always been very high on, especially since their fathers were very good for business. They fit the mould of The Rock, albeit without much of the awesome that The Rock had. Gail Kim & Christian won niche titles that never got much push. The Bashams, Team Angle, Kenzo & Dupree & La Resistance were all given respective Tag Titles, which have not meant much lately. However, having consistent teams like La Rez & Team Angle holding the belts gave them stability. Paul London & Batista got Tag Titles by partnering with more experienced wrestlers.

And if you look at the list of green champions, a large chunk of them (Orton, Carlito, Batista, Cena, Gail Kim, La Rez, Team Angle, Rico) came from the WWE's farm system. You have got to believe that if the company sunk years and money into training them, you would be confident enough to give them a title. Or, in other words, they want to show off their fancy new toys.
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#10 Posted on 26.3.05 2250.28
Reposted on: 26.3.12 2251.13
I sorta agree with Steph on this topic. The ones I will over look are Orton and Carlito because they acutally have rights to be in the WWE due to growing up in and around the business.

The guys that she refers to are in the likes of Gene Snitsky and John Heidenreich. Gawd, close your eyes for these train wrecks, first they feed us Heidenreich going after Undertaker. Then they bring in Snitsky to chase after Kane and kill Litas baby.

Then you have Horshu and Jindrak bodies that look like million bucks but still don't have the ring time to make everything flow.

Last but not least Muhammad Hassan, the gimmick is a heat machine, yet he looks lost sometime with the ring vets. So, she has a more great point, if we make enough noise the WWE might eventually listen. I doubt it as always though.
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#11 Posted on 27.3.05 0015.22
Reposted on: 27.3.12 0015.46
The problem is that of the 'new' young guys that WWE has brought up in the last couple of years, the only ones that can really wrestle are Eugene and Rob Conway. Others (Orton, Cena, Carlito) are average and carryable to a very good match, and the rest are all basically interchangable hosses. WWE should be looking to create guys that will be the next generation of road agents, not to create a bunch of guys who wrestle like HHH (since, like it's not obvious, they're all being molded in his image since it's the laziest/easiest way to be a 'good' wrestler possible).
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#12 Posted on 27.3.05 0016.06
Reposted on: 27.3.12 0016.10
    Originally posted by jwrestle
    I sorta agree with Steph on this topic. The ones I will overlook are Orton and Carlito because they acutally have rights to be in the WWE due to growing up in and around the business.


Would you please explain to me how or why this entitles them to prominent positions in WWE? We're talking about nepotism here, something that is universally regarded as an unfair business practise. I can understand a tendency toward presenting them with an opportunity because of their famous parentage, but deciding abiltrarily that they will become big stars and proceeding to shove that rashly arrived at decision down the throats of every fan unfortunate enough to be in your orbit is not an entirely wise business practise.

I'm willing to bet Randy Orton won't be around in five years. The biggest casualty of his overpush was Orton himself. I have no sympathy for him because I can't stand him and want him permanently off my television, but I won't blind myself to the fact that part of the reason for his failure was WWE's fault. They've doomed him. He has nowhere left to go. These rocket-to-the-moon pushes are short-sighted because you create guys that peak within a few years of their beginnings. Goldberg bailed. Brock Lesnar bailed. The Rock was gone before he turned thirty, but at least he made money while he was there. Now, with Orton winning last year and Cena likely sometime this year, we have to wait and see if they still want to bang up their bodies in five years when they've already accomplished everything there is to do in wrestling.

I think when people reach their pinnacle professionally, it is only natural that they want to move on to other things. When you factor in how difficult the wrestling lifestyle is on the body, the mind, and the family of the performer it's really not hard to figure out why these people don't stick around for long.


(edited by Hogan's My Dad on 26.3.05 2216)
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#13 Posted on 27.3.05 0021.00
Reposted on: 27.3.12 0021.23
    Originally posted by Hogan's My Dad
      Originally posted by jwrestle
      I sorta agree with Steph on this topic. The ones I will overlook are Orton and Carlito because they acutally have rights to be in the WWE due to growing up in and around the business.


    Would you please explain to me how or why this entitles them to prominent positions in WWE? We're talking about nepotism here, something that is universally regarded as an unfair business practise. I can understand a tendency toward presenting them with an opportunity because of their famous parentage, but deciding abiltrarily that they will become big stars and proceeding to shove that rashly arrived at decision down the throats of every fan unfortunate enough to be in your orbit is not an entirely wise business practise.

    I'm willing to bet Randy Orton won't be around in five years. The biggest casualty of his overpush was Orton himself. I have no sympathy for him because I can't stand him and want him permanently off my television, but I won't blind myself to the fact that part of the reason for his failure was WWE's fault. They've doomed him. He has nowhere left to go. These rocket-to-the-moon pushes are short-sighted because you create guys that peak within a few years of their beginnings. Goldberg bailed. Brock Lesnar bailed. The Rock was gone before he turned thirty, but at least he made money while he was there. Now, with Orton winning last year and Cena likely sometime this year, we have to wait and see if they still want to bang up their bodies in five years when they've already accomplished everything there is to do in wrestling.

    I think when people reach their pinnacle professionally, it is only natural that they want to move on to other things. When you factor in how difficult the wrestling lifestyle is on the body, the mind, and the family of the performer it's really not hard to figure out why these people don't stick around for long.


    (edited by Hogan's My Dad on 26.3.05 2216)


Hogan's My Dad brings up a good point. Guys like The Rock, Orton, etc are almost predestined to be huge stars based upon their families, so they don't have to really develop as workers as a necessity. Contrast that with guys like Benoit, Jericho, Stone Cold and others. They weren't as politically plugged-in because of their families, so to get noticed they had to become better workers. I'm in the mindset that part of booking is "Gee, I know Orton's dad, he's a good guy. Let's do business with him" and another part is "Did you see that match Jericho had? Let's do something with him...".
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#14 Posted on 27.3.05 0644.08
Reposted on: 27.3.12 0644.52
Chris:

Sad part about the AP stylebook is that I think it's losing its luster; for print journalism, it's probably still in use. However, the more and more I see TV copy translated to online, it's thrown out the window.

Alas, the usage of numbers below 10 written out does stick out like a sore thumb.
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#15 Posted on 27.3.05 0757.23
Reposted on: 27.3.12 0757.26
What exactly does Randy Orton have to move on to from wrestling? I think what's being overlooked most when saying that they'll be gone from the business in five years is that these guys LOVE the business. They weren't in it for money like Goldberg, or a headcase like Brock Lesnar. Cena could conceivably leave for either rap or acting, but he isn't exactly smacking with credibility or talent in either category right now. Using The Rock (the biggest celebrity hybrid wrestling will ever see) and then Goldberg and Brock Lesnar as examples of the typical wrestler is stupid. Using that logic, Jericho would've retired before Wrestlemania X-8, and Benoit would've retired last year.
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#16 Posted on 27.3.05 0934.38
Reposted on: 27.3.12 0935.07
I didn't mention names in the article because I didn't want to bash on the wrestlers. Becoming a star in the wrestling business is a tough task; so I give them the benefice of the doubt.

It's the way the WWE push them to the moon that I dislike.

I'm a fan of Orton but I sure think he wasn't ready for the World belt last year. Winning the heavyweight belt should be a career high, not a stepping stone.

Also, there seems to be some confusion about my name. I'm a guy. Stephane is the French equivalent of Stephen.
Hogan's My Dad
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#17 Posted on 27.3.05 1045.53
Reposted on: 27.3.12 1047.29
    Originally posted by TheMASKEDComputerGeek
    What exactly does Randy Orton have to move on to from wrestling? I think what's being overlooked most when saying that they'll be gone from the business in five years is that these guys LOVE the business. They weren't in it for money like Goldberg, or a headcase like Brock Lesnar. Cena could conceivably leave for either rap or acting, but he isn't exactly smacking with credibility or talent in either category right now. Using The Rock (the biggest celebrity hybrid wrestling will ever see) and then Goldberg and Brock Lesnar as examples of the typical wrestler is stupid. Using that logic, Jericho would've retired before Wrestlemania X-8, and Benoit would've retired last year.


It's not stupid at all, but thanks for your arrogance. I used those examples because they are three prominent people who were pushed right out of the gate. I wasn't talking about typical wrestlers, megapushes are about as atypical as you can get. I was talking about guys who have nothing left to accomplish after five years. Jericho toiled for ages to get into the position he was in by X-8, and Benoit toiled for almost two decades to get to his moment last year in MSG. If they'd both been main eventers and world champions within two years of entering the business, maybe they wouldn't be here in 2005. Benoit probably still would, but Jericho would probably be popping eardrums off someplace.

What do you do with Randy Orton for the next five years? You've already given him the pinnacle. Anything else is just going to seem like lip service, and the harder it gets for them to come up with things for him to do the less inclined he's going to want to be to stick around. It doesn't matter if he doesn't have anything else to do, lots of people with less prospects than him have left.

I think it's just worth considering how far Bret Hart or Shawn Michaels or Steve Austin or just about any other significant name in the business would have developed their abilities if they'd gotten to the top that easily. What would be their incentive to improve? What would they be trying to redeem if they hadn't been denied for so long?

With these young guys today, they've taken the carrot off the hook, but they still expect these rabbits to run and it's not gonna happen.
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#18 Posted on 27.3.05 1819.02
Reposted on: 27.3.12 1819.03
Regarding perceived nepotism with Carlito Caribbean Cool and Randy Orton, I don't think that's the case. They are both more talented than the average WWE superstar, in my opinion. Some might disagree, and that's fine, but I think that you would at least have to admit that both have a lot of potential. Now when they're looking at who to push shouldn't it be natural to look at two guys who not only have a wealth of athleticism and aptitude but also have, unlike other people, a lifetime in the business and therefore probably know more about the small things in wrestling than anyone else their age knows? I think that should be something that they look at. I mean, if I gave you Wrestler A and Wrestler B, and Wrestler A had a family in the business, wouldn't you take that to be an asset for Wrestler A? Wrestling is a job where it really helps to have had a family in the business.

Regarding the monster push, I agree with your point to some extent, but I also tend to disagree with the principle. The Rock was in the WWF for two years before winning the title. That's a fairly sizable amount of time for a guy who is so talented. And clearly, by Survivor Series 1998, Rocky was more over than anyone in the Fed except for Stone Cold Steve Austin. You call the monster push short-sighted, but the WWF made boatloads of money with the Rock on top. To not give him the ball would have been short-sighted.

Now on the other hand, the monster pushes given to Lesnar and Goldberg didn't really work out in the long term, and I blame that partially on them not really having a "love for the business" (which I think a second or third generation superstar like Orton and Carlito probably have). But really, what would you do with a guy like Goldberg? I don't think WCW could have had him working prelims against Hardbody Harrison and Silver King for two years. I think that in the end, WWF and WCW did the right things with Lesnar and Goldberg because, even though it didn't work out long term, it gave them a legitimate main eventer that drew money.
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#19 Posted on 27.3.05 2114.11
Reposted on: 27.3.12 2114.45
" It doesn't matter if he doesn't have anything else to do, lots of people with less prospects than him have left."

Has absolutely nothing to do with what's being talked about. I'd like for you to name these guys who have flat out left the business and didn't move onto another wrestling territory. You didn't refute my main point about passion for the business that seperated the wrestlers you're chastising from the wrestlers you noted (2 of which didn't and don't care for the wrestling, are more interested in the payouts, and 1 of which is the biggest crossover star in the history of wrestling, so don't be so silly as to compare Randy Orton to him as Rock didn't leave for a lack of things to accomplish in the WWE, he left because he had an opportunity to become a major actor).
The Thrill
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#20 Posted on 28.3.05 0134.15
Reposted on: 28.3.12 0135.30
    Originally posted by Teppan-Yaki
    Chris:

    Sad part about the AP stylebook is that I think it's losing its luster; for print journalism, it's probably still in use. However, the more and more I see TV copy translated to online, it's thrown out the window.

    Alas, the usage of numbers below 10 written out does stick out like a sore thumb.


Nevermind the AP Style Guide...I'd be happier (read: less disgusted) with the biz when we collectively re-learn how to spell things correctly...and stop using industry slang in chyron font and tease copy.

I personally would pay for CRZ to run a workshop to re-teach TV producers how to write...if for nothing else, just to get "THAT'S HIS MOVE!" and "(x) IS WALKING!" on the air. We'll just tell 'em they're consultant buzzwords.
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