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22.11.07 1203
The 7 - Current Events & Politics - Sources: Miller for Senate in California?
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Grimis
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#1 Posted on 29.9.03 1156.27
Reposted on: 29.9.10 1159.01
If there is any more evidence that us Republicans are going to have to do a little more work than just getting Ah-nold elected governor, this is it.

Of course, I'm behind any effort that can end Barbara Boxer's career....

* * * * * *

Republican Party seeks to draft Miller into politics
By Joe Mathews
LOS ANGELES TIMES

Arnold Schwarzenegger may be the latest celebrity to transform himself into a candidate for high California office. But if some Republican political operatives have their way, he will not be the last.

The comedian Dennis Miller is being talked about, apparently seriously, as a Republican candidate for a statewide post. Three Republican strategists interviewed in the past week have said they want to draft Miller into politics. One, a prominent Republican operative and Schwarzenegger aide who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said that once the recall election is over, he plans to recruit Miller to challenge Barbara Boxer for her U.S. Senate seat next year.

The Schwarzenegger campaign even provided Miller a political audition of sorts this week. The comedian, famous for his raunchy and irreverent rants and his stint on "Saturday Night Live" more than a decade ago, provided the campaign's official post-debate spin in Sacramento Wednesday night. Later the same evening, Miller spoke at a Schwarzenegger rally.

Miller, who is registered to vote as a Republican in Santa Barbara, betrayed no political ambitions in either appearance. He was filming a guest appearance on the Fox show "Boston Public" this week and declined to be interviewed for this story. But that has not kept Republicans from considering the possibility.

Some point to his history of doing serious political comedy and his willingness to branch out from his acting career. He did a recent two-year stint as a football announcer on ABC's "Monday Night Football," though the experiment of comedian as sports commentator received a cool reception from viewers and critics.

"There's a lot of us who'd like to see him campaign," Rob Stutzman, a Republican consultant and Schwarzenegger spokesman, said this week, noting Miller's appeal to younger voters. "Dennis Miller is at the cutting edge of biting political commentary."

That Miller is even being talked about as a candidate underscores the realities of contemporary California politics; and how Schwarzenegger's candidacy has already changed them. The movie star's ability to transition in a matter of days from the screen, in "Terminator 3," to the campaign trail has prompted other celebrities to publicly contemplate similar career changes. (Actor Kelsey Grammer and tennis star Martina Navratilova are among those who have talked about opening political careers in recent weeks.)

"You know all of the people on 'Friends' are going to be available. They are making $1 million an episode. Most everybody knows who they are," says Martin Kaplan, director of the University of Southern California's Norman Lear Center, which studies the intersection of politics and entertainment. "All this drives home the idea, I think a false one, that you don't need any particular skills or background to be a senator or a governor. All you need is ambition and fame."

Miller had an Emmy Award-winning show on HBO for nine seasons, "Dennis Miller Live," and has appeared in several movies and has published four books, all of which have the word "Rant" in the title. Kaplan says that while Miller has name recognition, he doesn't have Schwarzenegger's ability to "chill the enthusiasm of other Republicans from getting into the race."

Democrats and other political experts say celebrities are attractive candidates precisely because of the weakness of California Republicans. Not a single Republican currently holds statewide office; as such, the party lacks obvious candidates when high-profile seats come open. Republican consultants also want for well-funded clients, adding to the attractiveness of celebrity candidates.

It is that vacuum, political experts say, that rallied Republicans so quickly to Schwarzenegger.

Roy Behr, a spokesman for Boxer, said Friday that "naturally, we would welcome him or anybody else into the race." He said the serious discussion of such candidates demonstrated Republicans lack adequate challengers.

"The Republican party has gone through a desperate search to find someone who is remotely credible; they've looked at everybody and everything and they couldn't find anybody, so they're looking at bringing in the circus," Behr said. "I think the public has always registered how they feel about Dennis Miller, and that's why he got booted off 'Monday Night Football.'"

Whatever his intentions, Miller has been raising his political profile for at least a year.

He spoke out passionately in favor of the war in Iraq. He has made frequent appearances on conservative talk radio.

In June, Miller spoke at fund-raisers for President Bush in Los Angeles and San Francisco and endorsed the recall. "It's no longer the San Andreas fault; it's Gray Davis' fault," Miller said then, a line he repeated this week at a Schwarzenegger rally.

In his two appearances on behalf of Schwarzenegger this week, Miller cut a less than conventional political figure. Known for his literary and historical references, he entered the media room after Wednesday's debate and immediately compared Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante to Sancho Panza in an extended allusion to "Don Quixote." He also used an expletive for toilet. And he declared of Schwarzenegger that "anyone who can negotiate back-end deals in Hollywood surely can resurrect this budget."
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DMC
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#2 Posted on 29.9.03 1659.06
Reposted on: 29.9.10 1700.55
If McClintock can stick to his pledge of not dropping out without causing Arnold to lose the election, wouldn't he make a more sound choice to challenge Boxer? Or can he not run?

I think it would be a mistake for California Republicans to totally ignore the base of the party. Ok, getting Arnold in and Gray out is one thing, but to totally dump on conservative social causes is going to ultimately hurt them. The base will either not vote or vote for someone else in the future.

EDIT: I say this because in my limited knowledge of Miller, he is socially liberal as well.

DMC



(edited by DMC on 29.9.03 1603)
Grimis
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#3 Posted on 29.9.03 2105.34
Reposted on: 29.9.10 2107.12
    Originally posted by DMC
    If McClintock can stick to his pledge of not dropping out without causing Arnold to lose the election, wouldn't he make a more sound choice to challenge Boxer?

Of course, which is why the CAGOP won't let that happen...
MoeGates
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#4 Posted on 29.9.03 2243.17
Reposted on: 29.9.10 2243.46
Once again, the Conservative mind at work:

Any moderately famous person who espouses anything remotely resembling a liberal opinion is, of course, a member of the effete Hollywood elite, and at least three segments on Fox News must be devoted to why he/she is not qualified to offer an opinion on anything other than if the Chablis is best served with the Brie or the Cambembert.

Any moderately famous person who espouses anything remotely resembling a conservative opinion, however, should be encouraged to run for statewide office. They are qualified to offer an opinion on everything and anything because they a "succesful businessman." The definition of "succesful busisnessman," of course, is that they have enough money to buy campaign advertising and are willing to put a big "R" after their name.

Heck, whatever you want to put in your pipe that gets you high enough to hold on to your fantasy of Beating Barbara Boxer, whether it's Dennis Miller, or Tom McClintock, or Micky Mouse, it's up to you.

(edited by MoeGates on 29.9.03 2352)
MoeGates
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#5 Posted on 29.9.03 2243.19
Reposted on: 29.9.10 2244.57
(deleted by Jaguar on 29.9.03 2348)
CRZ
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#6 Posted on 30.9.03 0350.24
Reposted on: 30.9.10 0358.25
    Originally posted by Grimis
      Originally posted by DMC
      If McClintock can stick to his pledge of not dropping out without causing Arnold to lose the election, wouldn't he make a more sound choice to challenge Boxer?

    Of course, which is why the CAGOP won't let that happen...
I believe the California GOP is more interested in candidates who could actually WIN THE ELECTION. Just because McClintock isn't as conservative as, say, Bruce Herschenson doesn't mean that he's not still too conservative to defeat Boxer. If one were rooting for the Republicans, one would hope they're not so stupid as to blow ANOTHER six years like they did the LAST time. (Actually, come to think of it, Bruce wasn't the one Boxer got past last time...in '98 it was actually the brilliant Matt Fong. Man, California folk sure can pick some candidates.)

(edited by CRZ on 30.9.03 0152)
Grimis
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#7 Posted on 30.9.03 0615.24
Reposted on: 30.9.10 0616.50
    Originally posted by CRZ
    I believe the California GOP is more interested in candidates who could actually WIN THE ELECTION. Just because McClintock isn't as conservative as, say, Bruce Herschenson doesn't mean that he's not still too conservative to defeat Boxer. If one were rooting for the Republicans, one would hope they're not so stupid as to blow ANOTHER six years like they did the LAST time.

McClintock could win if he got the full party support. His numbers have been rising as he gets more exposure, and he could probably do very well in a debate against her. Remember, when Reagan ran as a conservative they said he couldn't win either.

Matt Fong on the other hand....oy.
ges7184
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#8 Posted on 30.9.03 0940.18
Reposted on: 30.9.10 0941.49
I would think there should be more to politics than getting guys that just happen to have a "R" next to their name into office. That's why I'm pretty disgruntled with the system right now. It seems that both parties are only interested in doing whatever it takes to win elections, but not really that interested in moving an agenda* once they get there.(and they choose the path of least resistance, what does it take to win NOW, instead of trying to sell the people on your agenda, tell people why your ideas are good, swing public opinion. They prefer to just adjust their own ideals to meet the requirements of whatever public opinion happens to be now) It's almost as if it gets treated as a sporting event. As long as the Republicans hold a 51-49 lead in the Senate, who cares about anything else.

I could care less about the number of Republicans in office. I want to see 'victories' for conservatism. If people can't win on conservative ideals, I could care less if they have a 'R' or 'D' next to their name. I'm not going to feel very good about the candidate regardless. (Heck, there are a couple of Democrats that I personally like better than most Republicans. I care about the issues, not the party) I would think true liberals would feel the same way.

* I think that the Democrats, however, do a better job of actually pushing some sort of an agenda. In fact, sometimes it seems that the Democrats are pushing their agenda, and then Republicans start pushing a Democrat-lite agenda. If we are going to put in, for example, a prescription drug benefit anyway, we may as well fully fund it now as the Democrats want, instead of the 'lite' version the Republicans want, because it's going to cost that much anyway. If we are going to go liberal, no need to half-ass it. Given a choice between Democrat and Democrat-lite, I would choose Democrat. If a program is worth doing, it's worth doing, and we should go ahead and spend.



(edited by ges7184 on 30.9.03 0945)
OlFuzzyBastard
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#9 Posted on 30.9.03 1106.20
Reposted on: 30.9.10 1110.12
    Originally posted by DMC
    I say this because in my limited knowledge of Miller, he is socially liberal as well.


He was completely liberal until he found out his HBO show was getting cancelled and decided to turn right-wing whore in hopes for a new series on Faux News.

Dennis Miller, ranting on George W. Bush, a few weeks before he decided to become a Republican:

"The Russian Prime Minister has declared Space Station Mir too old and decrepit to be useful anymore. Naturally, the space station will now begin confirmation hearings to serve on Geroge W. Bush's cabinet sometime next week.

Bush leaned on Donald Rumsfeld to take time off from writing his memoirs of the Battle of Hastings to serve as Secretary of Defense. Rumsfeld keeps pushing for that Star Wars Catapult Defense System, because he's afraid the North Koreans might have the crossbow.

And on Monday, movers went to the Governor's Mansion in Austin, Texas to transfer Bush's belongings to Washington. The move itself took very little time once workers discovered that Bush had nothing upstairs.

Now, I don't want to get off on a rant here, but as a comedian, with George W. Bush coming into office, I feel like the owner of a hardware store before a hurricane. I hate to see it coming but I have to admit it's good for business.

I'll take my shots at Dubya, but I actually have high hopes for the next four years. I see George W. Bush working hard to keep the ambitions of big business and the military in check, and ensure that even the lowest job pays a dignified wage. I believe he'll erase the animus that has divided Washington, and bring both sides of the aisle together. I also happen to believe dogs can talk if you touch them in the right spot, and everyone watching me is happy with their body.

As much as I'm willing to give Bush a chance, I'm a little nervous about his intellectual capacity. I mean, at least Clinton had his dick to think with.

And Clinton did a lot of thinking. If I were Bush, the first day I took over, I'd have a convoy of six Rug Doctor trucks come chugging through the main entrance of the White House, park right in front of the TV cameras, and start dragging their steam-cleaning hoses through the Oval Office door. Well, come on. It's got to be like buying Bob Guccione's mattress at a yard sale.

You can say what you want about Bush, but he's going to surround himself with people who are so experienced that they aren't gonna let him eat at the grown-up table for a long time.

And you can't understand the great and powerful Bush without peeking behind the curtain at the clever bald man pulling all the levers: Vice President Dick "It's Probably Just Gas" Cheney. Now, Cheney's heartbeat skips more than Richard Simmons on his way to a Ricky Martin concert. You know, the job of V.P. doesn't give you that much to do, so it would be a shame if the very first state funeral he attended was his own. But Cheney is also smart, crafty and persuasive, so give George credit for putting him on the team. Most presidential candidates try to pick a running mate who won't outshine them, but who would that be for Bush? Maybe Wilson the volleyball from the movie "Cast Away."

Let's put Bush's cabinet under the microscope, or, as he calls it, "the little-stuff-to-big-stuff thingy."

Now, we do need to cut Bush some slack on Linda Chavez. How could he possibly know the woman had a Guatemalan slave? Chavez got out quickly. I guess she felt that if people had a hard time with the illegal alien maid, they might respond even more negatively to the 30 Haitians assembling "Salad Shooters" in her basement.

Attorney General nominee John Ashcroft will not be able to fill Janet Reno's shoes, but then again neither could Shaquille ONeill. But what I don't understand is how Ashcroft can be so pro-Death Penalty when he lost his last election bid to Mel Carnahan, a dead guy. What's really scary is that most people thought Carnahan won the debates, too.

National Security Advisor nominee Condoleezza Rice has often been described as W.'s "foreign policy tutor". Oh, yeah, I love the sound of that. It's nice to know we're signing our nuclear arsenal over to a man who needs after-school help. Don't you think the fact that he needs a tutor ought to be raising more eyebrows than Eminem teaching kindergarten on the planet Vulcan?

Secretary of Health and Human Services nominee Tommy Thompson says his top priorities include overhauling social security and Medicare as well as fixing his stupid name. Hey, what kinda guy makes it past forty with a "y" on the end of his first name? Hey, Tommy Thompson, nice to meet you, you loser fuck, I'm Denny Dennerson.

For Secretary of State, Bush chose Colin Powell. Okay, no complaints there. Nice to see that Bush picked a minority. After all, a minority picked him.

All in all, George W. Bush has to have had the same reaction that I did after I got the job on Monday Night Football. Hey, what in the hell happened here? I only applied for the job because I never thought they would actually give it to me. So my advice, George, is take your lumps and jump in there. For me it was the best thing I ever did, next to this show on HBO of course. Man, it's hard kissing two asses at once.

You know, in the end, it's hard to know what history will make of the second Bush presidency. Will it be regarded as an aberration in the electoral process? A surprisingly capable underdog effort? Maybe just a placeholder in the strange but easy-to-remember Presidential sequence "Bush-Clinton-Bush-Clinton." Whatever is to be, there's one thing we know: It's time for Daddy's little boy to grow up. George W. Bush's seemingly endless supply of free passes is now officially drier than any of the oilwells he once managed. Well, I, for one, wish him the best.

Now, I don't pretend to know anything about the Machiavellian intricacies of politics, the " one - hand - washes - the - other - that - scratches - the - back - that - spanks - the - monkey - that - gives - the - reacharound - " to whomever. All I know is, with the Nasdaq numbers acting like they're in a fight scene from "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" and the once-madly-thriving economy now teetering like Forrest Whitaker in a pair of Jimmy Choo stilettos, if I were Dubya, the first thing I'd do when I set foot in the White House, before I unpacked the video golf game, before I started crank-calling my old frat brothers, before I snuck up behind Dick Cheney and popped an inflated paper bag, the first thing I'd do is get my ass on the phone and send Alan Greenspan a four-year supply of Omaha fucking steaks.

Of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong."


(edited by OlFuzzyBastard on 30.9.03 1209)
ges7184
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#10 Posted on 1.10.03 0913.50
Reposted on: 1.10.10 0915.26
I think it's hard to get a true guage of where Miller's loyalties lie, because I also recall that he was a huge Ross Perot supporter during the '92 campaign. I don't know where you would put Ross on the political scale, but I don't think he was really a liberal.
Bizzle Izzle
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#11 Posted on 1.10.03 0944.28
Reposted on: 1.10.10 0944.57
Regarding Miller's rant on GW that OFB pasted for us: look at the date. I'm not about to fault him for changing his opinion of Bush. Look what happend 9 months after that rant was posted on 12 Jan 2001. A lot of people changed their opinion and looked favorably on Bush after that, and continue to do so.
vsp
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#12 Posted on 1.10.03 1114.37
Reposted on: 1.10.10 1114.44
    Originally posted by Bizzle Izzle
    I'm not about to fault him for changing his opinion of Bush. Look what happened 9 months after that rant was posted on 12 Jan 2001. A lot of people changed their opinion and looked favorably on Bush after that, and continue to do so.


And I honestly wish I knew why.
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